War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0236 Chapter XXXVII. N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

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sels are with Rear-Admiral Lee. McCrea has only the Jacob Bell and Reliance. Her crank is cracked and banded for temporary use. She and the Reliance were detailed to convoy General Hooker's transports. The rest of the flotilla available consist of mortar-schooners. Communicate this directly to the major-general commanding.

A. A. HARWOOD,

Commodore.

[Indorsement.]

Respectfully forwarded to Major-General Hooker.

SAMUEL MAGAW,

Lieutenant-Commander.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. OF THE ARMY, ADJT. General 'S OFFICE,

Numbers 181. Washington, April 20, 1863.

I. Brigadier-General Barry, U. S. Volunteers, will at once proceed to Harper's Ferry and make a thorough inspection of the defenses of that place. He will see that they are put in perfect order with the least practicable delay. Having completed this duty, General Barry will return to this city.

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By command of Major-General Halleck:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Numbers 108. Camp near Falmouth, Va., April 20, 1863.

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VI. Brigadier General C. Devens, volunteer service, will report to the major-general commanding the Eleventh Army Corps, for assignment to a division of that corps.

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By commanding of Major-General Hooker:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAMP THE FALMOUTH, VA.,

April 21, 1863-9 a. m.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

My latest advised from Major-General Stoneman were up to 9 o'clock yesterday morning. At that time his command was moving to ascertain whether of not the fords were practicable. If he had crossed, I cannot but feel that I should have been informed of it ere this. General Stoneman reports that more rain has fallen in the mountains that lower down the river; thence the slowness of the waters in falling. I am expecting to hear from him hourly.

The weather appears to continue adverse to the execution of my plans as first formed, as, in fact all others; but if these do not admit of speedy solution, I fell that I must modify them to conform to the condition of things as they are. I was attached to the movement as first projected, as it promised unusual success; but if it fails, I will project a