War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0222 Chapter XXXVII. N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

Search Civil War Official Records

supplies of hard bread, salt, sugar coffee; one day's pork, four days' fresh beef, 9,500, and five days' forage for your animals, the animals' [forage] being based upon the quantity you were about to take when the six days' [supplies] were loaded to start with on Monday last. This train, upon its arrival, should make you whole for the time lost by the storm, and leave you in fresh condition to carry on the operations with which you were intrusted. If the amount of supplies which you are advised will be sent is in excess of your requirement, please return notice to us as speedily as possible, and send out officers to meet the train and send what portion of it you do not need. The commanding general directs that you send out meet this train, and that it be unloaded and returned without delay.

The bearer is expected to return immediately with your reply, giving the field return and the condition of your supplies.

Copy of a dispatch to-day received from General Haupt is forwarded for your information. By this you will see that it will be impossible to repair the railroad in time to furnish you supplied by rail to Rappahannock Station.

The rations for the men are 50,000 rations, as mentioned herein, save bacon is substituted for pork.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

APRIL 17, 1863.

Major-General BUTTERFIELD:

Yesterday Bull Run Bridge was entirely carried away by freshest. It will require three days to reconstruct and open communication Shall it be done? Please answer. Will you need our forces on the other road?

H. HAUPT.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,

April 17, 1863.

Commanding Officer, Cavalry Corps:

The train of supplies sent you will be 300 wagon-loads of grain 1,500 pounds each, and 50,000 rations, as advised in my dispatch of this noon. Should you need more supplies, you must send for them.

It is necessary that this train should be returned as speedily as possible. You will, therefore, take the proper means to accomplish this by having the train met as far out the road toward Falmouth as practicable.

The train will leave at daylight to-morrow.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Camp near Falmouth, Va., April 17, 1863.

Commanding Officer, Cavalry Corps:

The commanding general directs me to say that it was not expected that you would embarrass yourself wagons in your present expe-