War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0213 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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you direct the wagon train morrisville to move to General Avarell's late camp on Potomac Creek, guarding it with you command on its march down.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. TAYLOR,

Chief of Staff.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,

April 15, 1863.

His excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

A letter from Major-General Stoneman, dated 1 p. m. yesterday, informs me that his command will be across the river before daylight this morning (the 15th). It was his intention to cross at three points, all above the Rappahannock Station. I sent him six days' rations for men and animals, by wagons, to be distributed just before his passage of the river. The wagons are now on their return.

From the Rappahannock, if he should meet with unusual delay, he will strike the Aquia and Richmond Railroad on the night of the second day.

Meanwhile I shall do what I can to keep the enemy up to their works in my front, and, if they should fall back, shall pursue with all the vigor practicable.

Up to late last night the enemy appeared to have suspicions of our designs.

This morning I can see nothing from the storm.

I am rejoiced that Stoneman had two good days to go up the river, and was enabled to cross it before it before it had become too much swollen. If he can reach his position, the storm and mud will damage our prospects. He has been furnished with a copy of Major-General Peck's dispatch, regarding the number of the enemy in his immediate front. If it should be true, Richmond can have no soldiers in the city at this time.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

April 15, 1863.

General STONEMAN:

Dispatches of April 15, from-, signal by the chief of your staff, have been received. The commanding general desires me to call your attention to your letter of instructions. The tenor of your dispatch might indicate that you were maneuvering your whole force against the command of Fitz. Lee, numbering not over 2,000 men,. The commanding general does not expect,nor do your instructions indicate, that you are to act from base or depot. When any messengers are coming this way, please acknowledge the received of the dispatch concerning the telegraph from General Peck, sent for your information.+

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

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* Not found.

+ Copy of this dispatch forwarded by Hooker to the President and Secretary of War, April 16.

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