War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0186 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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vedettes on our right have been driven in by a large force of the enemy's cavalry, supported by six guns. I have received no report of this from my line, but will take measures to ascertain the truth, and report at once.

"J. L. THOMPSON,

"Lieutenant-Colonel."

I have given the necessary orders, and am ready and waiting for further information.

W. W. AVERELL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WM. L. CANDLER,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. OF THE ARMY, ADJT. GEN'S OFFICE,

Numbers 149.

Washington, April 1, 1863.

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Vi. Brigadier General Thomas G. Pitcher, U. S. Volunteers, will report in person, without delay, to Major-General Hooker, commanding Army of the Potomac.

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By command of Major-General Halleck:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS, Charleston, W. Va., April 1, 1863.

(Received, Clarksburg, April 1.)

Brigadier General B. S. ROBERTS:

Guerrillas have retreated by the way they came or through the same district of country. All these raids are but to withdraw attention from the front. Rebels were whipped back with loss; but without horses no long or rapid movements can be made in this country, especially at this season. My posts all duly cautioned and are on the qui vive, but I doubt their effecting anything decisive against the retreating rebels. Infantry cannot pursue cavalry, nor effectually block a dozen roads against half their own numbers. What cipher do you use?

E. P. SCAMMON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJT. GEN'S OFFICE,

Numbers 83.

Washington, April 1, 1863.

The new or modified forts and batteries around Washington will hereafter be known by the following names:

The name of the enlarged work now known as Fort Massachusetts to by changed to Fort Stevens, after Brigadier General I. I. Stevens, U. S. Volunteers, of Massachusetts, who was killed September 1, 1862, at the battle of Chantilly, Va.

The name of the enlarged work now known as Fort Pennsylvania to be changed to Fort Reno, after Major General, Jesse L. Reno, U. S. Volunteers (captain of ordnance), of Pennsylvania, who was mortally wounded, September 14, 1862, at the battle of South Mountain, Md.

The fort next and east of Fort Ripley to be called Fort Mansfield, after Brigadier General Joseph K. F. Mansfield, U. S. Army, who was mortally wounded, September 17, 1862, at the battle of Antietam, Md.

The new fort next and east of fort Mansfield to be called Fort Sim