War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0165 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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CHARLESTON, W. VA., March 29, 1863-8 a. m.

Lieutenant-Colonel CHESEBROUGH:

Yesterday I sent this to General Cox:

Two cavalry forces are coming down Sandy toward Ceredo, one on either side of the river. Hear of fighting yesterday at Louisa all day. Posts were immediately warned, and scouts were ordered on all approaches; meantime heard from Lewisburg that Jenkins was en route here with 1,500 cavalry, via Sandy. Colonel Paxton, with some 300 men, had been ordered to scout from Camp Piatt, through Boone and Logan Counties. He returned last night with 7 prisoners; two officers. Lewisburg informant says it is to attack Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and Summerville by collecting men in small squads and meeting at a common rendezvous.

The Twenty-third Regiment is here, with three pieces of artillery. Fayette is watchful. Please hurry the horses and saddles, and, if you can, give us the force we had before Crook and Ewing left Valley.

E. P. SCAMMON,

Brigadier-General.

CHARLESTON, W. VA., March 29, 1863-8 p. m.

Lieutenant-Colonel CHESEBROUGH:

This morning was advised that Jenkins had attacked my outposts at Hurricane Brigade, 12 miles west of Coalsmouth, but troops were four companies of Fifth Virginia, very well posted, and, after four hours' fighting, report the enemy in retreat. Have sent three more companies to strengthen the post. Our loss trifling.

Colonel Toland reports that he has scouted the country 50 miles beyond Fayette, toward Pack's Ferry, and head of Coal. No enemy there. In this connection I beg to say that I have been trying for months to get horses to transport men to the front with celerity; this, for defense, would be best policy; offensively, we can do nothing without them. My troops are few and the district large; therefore rapid movement or nothing. I beg the general commanding army corps to order at least 2,000 horses with equipments for this district, otherwise we are necessarily harassed. later intelligence shows the attack at Hurricane had been by 400 men. We lost 4 killed, 5 wounded. Enemy's loss not given, but report speaks of a wounded prisoner, who says there are more rebel troops coming. He says there will be 20,000; this I give as received, but I doubt not that an attempt will be made on the Valley; if not, the way will be open for us to attack the railroad and salt-works, if we have means of locomotion and men to use them. This talk of prisoner accords with report received from Lewisburg; force exaggerated, I presume, but all indicating the purpose of the enemy to be what would make our increase profitable in any event, and indispensable if reports be true. At present we are too few for so wide a district, embracing so important a portion of the Ohio River.

E. P. SCAMMON,

Brigadier-General.

MARIETTA, OHIO, March 29, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. CHESEBROUGH,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Reports from Kanawha region whew that some rebel cavalry force has come in from Kentucky; a brisk skirmish took place day before yesterday at Hurricane Bridge, about 12 miles south of Red House, in which the enemy were driven off. Report to-night of one of the Kanawha