War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0151 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,

March 21, 1863.

Colonel R. INGALLS,

Chief Quartermaster:

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The accompanying statement gives the number of men for duty in each corps, according to the report of the 10th instant.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

First Corps

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15,510

Second Corps

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15,337

Third Corps

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17,438

Fifth Corps

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15,467

Sixth Corps

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22,076

Eleventh Corps

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12,880

Twelfth Corps

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11,933

Cavalry

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11,937

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Total

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122,578

Total, without cavalry, 110,641.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Numbers 79.

March 21, 1863.

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VIII. The batteries of horse artillery will reduce the number of ammunition chests on the caisson body to one, which will be arranged so as to sit over the axle, as in the Sixth New York Battery (Martin's). The remaining chests will be kept full. But one spare wheel to the section will be taken by each field battery of the army; the remainder will be turned into the ordnance department.

To reduce the weight, only six fellows, twelve spokes, one jack-screw, and one splinter-bar will be carried in the battery wagon. The excess of these articles will be turned into the ordnance department; no other stores than those authorized in the table of contents will be carried in the battery wagons and forges, except spare fuses and primers, well boxed and secured.

Repairs of gun-carriages, of wheels, &c., will, so far as possible, be made from the stores carried with the battery. When, from the extent of injuries received, in action or otherwise, it is necessary to employ more labor than the battery can supply, the commandant of artillery of the corps may collect such wheelwrights and other mechanics as are disposable from the batteries of his corps to effect it; when carriages and wheels are so broken as to be useless, the sound part will be secured, and as soon as possible the repairs effected.

When in camp, the coal-boxes will be filled with hard coal, if possible, and remain so, as they are intended to carry coal for the march. For ordinary use, other sources of supply must, when practicable, be depended on.

When the batteries go into camp with a prospect of remaining sufficiently long, the commandants of artillery will cause coal-pits to be made for current uses.

In the batteries of light 12-pounders, it is very important that the fuse be screwed down tightly, so that the horseshoe on the bottom may be supported by the shoulder of the fuse-hole. If this is not done, a premature explosion may result. The fuse-wrench, furnished with the