War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0140 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

March 16, 1863-6.30 p. m.

Hon E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have just received a telegram from the major-general commanding the army, informing me that it is expected that I will dispatch all my cavalry force to the protection of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. As this movement will involve consequences of the most momentous character, I have applied for unconditional orders. Please see that they are sent me. See my telegram to Major-General Halleck.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 16, 1863.

Major General J. HOOKER,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

I am not aware that any of your cavalry has been ordered to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. It is expected, however, that you will not permit a very large cavalry force to pass from your front to destroy that road without intercepting or destroying it. Very possibly Milroy's report of over 10,000 in his front is the old story. It was supposed you would know from your scouts whether or not there was good foundation for the report.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJT. General 'S OFFICE,

Numbers 66.

Washington, March 16, 1863.

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II. Brigadier General D. P. Woodbury, U. S. Volunteers, is relieved from duty with the Army of the Potomac, and assigned to the Department of the Gulf, to command the District of Key West and Tortugas.

III. All Western Virginia is included in the Middle Department.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON,

March 16, 1863.

Brigadier General GEORGE W. CULLUM,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: In compliance with your request, contained in note of 28th ultimo, I now forward you the "name, rank, regiment, and battle where the officers were killed, with date," after whom certain forts in this vicinity were recommended to be named:

Brigadier General I. I. Stevens, U. S. Volunteers, was killed at the battle of Chantilly, Va., September 1, 1862.

Major General Jesse L. Reno, U. S. Volunteers, captain of ordnance, died of wounds received at the battle of South Mountain, Md., September 14, 1862.

Brigadier General Joseph K. F. Mansfield, U. S. Army, died of wounds received at the battle of Antietam, Md., September 18 [17], 1862.