War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0105 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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AQUIA CREEK, February 25, 1863.

Major-General COUCH:

Let me know the hour of starting of the infantry brigade for Berea Church. Reserve Brigade, Regular cavalry, just started from there. The enemy are supposed to be lying around the vicinity of Hartwood. We want them caught, if possible. The commanding officer of the infantry force will co-operate with and support the cavalry.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

February 25, 1863.

Major-General COUCH:

Packing supplies for one or two days to the brigade at Berea Church; they may have to stay over to-morrow night.

General Stoneman will be at Hartwood at daylight. Let the commanding officer communicate with him and take his orders from him. Answer in the morning.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST CAVALRY DIVISION,

February 25, 1863-Midnight.

Brigadier General A. S. WILLIAMS,

Commanding Twelfth Corps d`Armee:

GENERAL: The general commanding-Pleasonton-directs me to express his thanks for the information received through your dispatch of this date, and to state that he does not see in what way a brigade of infantry would be of service to him at Aquia Church, nor does he think the enemy would be likely to cross in that vicinity, on account of the condition of the creek. Some 350 men of this division are picketing in your front, with whom he begs you will communicate, and to whom instructions from headquarters Cavalry Corps have been sent by him.

This division has been ordered to move at daylight to Aquia Church, by the Telegraph road.

The general will be thankful for any further information you may receive, and will in turn keep you advised.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. J. COHEN,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

BALTIMORE, MD.,

February 25, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I find that the whole of the pontoon here consists of fifty-eight boats, equal to a bridge of 1,740 feet. At Harper's Ferry we must have forty-two boats, equal to 1,260 feet. This is more than half of what General Woodbury allows. Thirty-nine boats had already been taken up before hearing from you. We want but three boats more. I beg that I may