War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0098 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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given to land the material upon barges-double-decked ones, if possible, such as are used for flour on the North River-not drawing more than 4 feet 6 inches or 5 feet of water, with which draught they can probably be taken up as far as the bridge at Widow Lumpkins', near Crump's Creek, within 5 miles by land of the railway. By attaching to the train about 100 feet of trestle bridging, constructed similarly to those prepared by Captain Duane, of the Engineers, for the pontoon train, but of stronger dimensions, the train could be landed at any point required.

The whole of this materiel, with the requirements, should be at Fortress Monroe by the 25th of this month at latest.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY J. HUNT,

Brigadier-General, Chief of Artillery.

[Indorsements.]

ARTILLERY HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

February 23, 1863.

A copy of this letter was placed in the hands of General Cullum, in presence of Major-General Halleck, in his office, by me, on December 27, 1862, and was returned to me, General Halleck stating that not a man nor a gun should leave the works about Washington.

Respectfully submitted for the information of Major-General Hooker.

HENRY J. HUNT,

Brigadier-General, Chief of Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

February 25, 1863.

General Hunt is desired to report the probable time that will be necessary to carry the within into execution.

By command of Major-General Hooker:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARTILLERY, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Falmouth, February 25, 1863.

Respectfully returned.

I do not know how long it will, take to prepare this siege train. It will depend upon the materiel on hand at Washington and upon the extent of the train required. I have made verbal representations to General Barry, inspector of artillery, U. S. Army, who, I believe, has taken some steps to collect or provide for the materiel. But if the general contemplates proceedings which will require a sedge train at any time this spring, provision cannot be made too soon for it. I deem it essential to its efficiency that the artillery troops which have already been instructed and have conducted one siege (that of Yorktown) should be put on this duty. Colonel (now Brigadier-General) Tyler should be put in charge. He can report on the materiel on hand.

HENRY J. HUNT,

Brigadier-General, Chief of Artillery.

OFFICE CHIEF OF ARTILLERY, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Falmouth, Va., February 24, 1863.

General S. WILLIAMS,

Asst. Adjt. General, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: In pursuance of the instructions contained in your circular of the 16th instant, I have respectfully to transmit herewith a