War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0094 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,

February 21, 1863.

Major General D. N. COUCH,

Commanding Second Corps:

In reply to your communication just received, Major-General Hooker directs me to say that it is a most extraordinary report. The general cannot think you expect him to bring your officers to a sense of their duty. He trusts that you will have no delay in bringing the officer who neglected his duty to trial and punishment. It is of the utmost importance to him to know it the enemy have any pontoons, and, if so, how many, and where they are. He desires that you should communicate to him without delay all reliable information you can obtain upon this point.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS, WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJT. General 'S OFFICE,

No. 86.

Washington, February 21, 1863.

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XXIV. Brigadier General H. W. Benham, U. S. Volunteers, will report in person, without delay, to Major-General Hooker, commanding Army of the Potomac, for duty.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS, HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF WASHINGTON,

No. 5.

February 21, 1863.

I. No sutlers' wagons or persons will be permitted to pass the limits of this department across the Occoquan and Bull Run for the purpose of reaching the Army of the Potomac.

II. Attention is again called to General Orders, No. 5, from these headquarters. The outposts in Virginia will respect no permits not countersigned at these headquarters.

By command of Major-General Heintzelman:

CARROLL H. POTTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

Falmouth, Va., February 22, 1863.

General WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

GENERAL: Your letter in reference to the movement of pontoons in Fredericksburg, &c., is received. At present I am unable to report anything in addition to that of yesterday, but, having directed a more diligent inquiry, will inform you as soon as it comes in. The men I questioned yesterday were not positive that pontoons were seen, but thought they were. As for the artillery, one man counted thirty-two 6-horse carriages that he supposed were artillery, but could not see the guns. In my letter I did not intend for the major-general commanding