War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0086 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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the force there, consisting of two or three regiments, and, while so engaging the enemy, send a small party through by-ways to destroy the bridge near Central Depot, if the force at that point be not too vigilant. Will you give your approval?

I would make the first-named movement depend for success on celerity of action; for the second, with 2,000 men, assisted in moving by all animals at our command, and accomplish by a small cavalry force, I would get on the roads leading south from Princeton, engage the enemy at daylight in the morning, and endeavor to capture of defeat him, while a small squad, duly equipped, should go by mountain paths to the railroad, cross the track to a point above the bridge, and then float down the river, with means for its destruction, apply them, and get back by any way that may seem best. Please say you.

Very respectfully.

E. P. SCAMMON,

Brigadier-General.

GENERAL ORDERS, HDQRS. MID. DEPT., 8TH ARMY CORPS,

No. 12.

Baltimore, Md., February 17, 1863.

General Orders, purporting to be No. 11, from these headquarters, February 12, 1863, was issued irregularly, and without authority, and is, therefore, now published in due form.

Lieutenant Colonel William D. Whipple, aide-de-camp, major and assistant adjutant-general, U. S. Army, having been assigned to duty as assistant adjutant-general at the headquarters of the Middle Department, is announced as such to the department, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly.

By command of Major-General Schenck:

WM. H. CHESEBROUGH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,

February 18, 1863.

General A. S. WILLIAMS,

Commanding Twelfth Corps:

The commanding general is informed that large numbers of deserters escape through our lines upon the road between Potomac Creek, Chopawamsic Creek, Dumfries, and Occoquan. He desires that the pickets in your front may be so carefully posted that it will be an impossibility for any person to pass the lines, and that the most positive and careful instructions be given to remedy this evil. No sutlers' wagons, teamsters, nor passage of any kind through our lines in that direction will be allowed, and all persons representing themselves to be paragraph repairers must be furnished with the most undoubted authority upon the subject. He directs that you instruct your pickets to shoot all deserters or persons attempting to pass our lines who do not, on being challenged, answer the summons of the sentinel and submit to examination by the proper officers.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.