War of the Rebellion: Serial 039 Page 1075 Chapter XXXVII. THE STONEMAN RAID.

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I attacked the enemy's cavalry and artillery half an hour after starting, and drove him until it was too dark to distinguish friend from foe.

From information received from a deserter, and from an intercepted dispatch, it was ascertained that Stuart's headquarters were at Brandy Station, and that he was awaiting our approach with his entire force, consisting of four brigades and fifteen pieces of artillery. This information was confirmed the following day.

On the morning of the 30th, I received the following dispatch at 7 a.m., viz:

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS, April 30, 1863.

Brigadier-General AVERELL,

Commanding, &c.:

The major-general commanding directs me to say that we did not get off this morning as soon as was anticipated, but will endeavor to carry out our original instructions in the next twenty-four hours. Keep your communications open with your infantry support. Our pack-train with Eleventh Corps.

Very respectfully,

A. J. ALEXANDER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

The infantry support referred to was probably the infantry division at Kelly's Ford.

My division arrived at Culpeper Court-House at 11 a.m., driving out, dispersing, and capturing a small force of the enemy. Sixty barrels of Confederate flour, a large amount of salt, bacon, &c., was found, and what we could not use was distributed among the poor people of the place.

The enemy was pursued rapidly 12 miles farther, by Cedar Mountain, toward the Rapidan. From prisoners taken, and from contrabands, it was learned that at least two brigades of the enemy's cavalry were fleeing before us.

At Culpeper Court-House a mail was captured, from the letters of which the intelligence was gathered that the Army of the Potomac was advancing over the line of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and that General Jackson was at Gordonsville with 25,000 men to resist it. This was corroborated by subsequent statements of prisoners, &c.

At 6.30 p.m. the following order was received, viz:

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS, April 30, 1863.

Brigadier-General AVERELL,

Commanding, &c.:

The major-general commanding directs me to say that we have been delayed by high water, &c., and that he desires you to push the enemy as vigorously as possible, keeping him fully occupied, and, if possible, drive him in the direction of Rapidan Station. He turns the enemy over to you.

Very respectfully,

A. J. ALEXANDER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

We had heard that the brigade of W. H. F. Lee had taken the road to that ford, and that the ford was impracticable. With the hope of catching him, we pushed on until we arrived at the station, 7.30 to 8 p.m., when the enemy opened an artillery fire upon my advance.

Halting in the road until morning, I pursued my instructions of fully occupying the enemy by first reconnoitering his position and then attacking him, in which operation his left was nearly turned. My right was within 3 miles of Orange Court-House, and he lost position of the night before, and some prisoners and killed and wounded.