War of the Rebellion: Serial 039 Page 0927 Chapter XXXVII. THE CHANCELLORSVILLE CAMPAIGN.

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ment occupied the left, and connected with McGowan's brigade, my front being covered by Company B (Captain C. E. Chambers), deployed as skirmishers. Under orders from Brigadier-General Archer, I advanced my regiment with McGowan's brigade. The ground over which we had to pass being rough and thickly wooded, I was soon unable to see the regiments on my right and left. Word being passed along the line of officers that our brigade was gaining ground to the right, I moved my regiment by that flank for a short distance, and again to the front, which brought us in view of the first position of the enemy, which was carried in a few minutes, and a considerable number of prisoners taken.

The advance from this point upon the second position being made in open ground, and under the immediate supervision of Brigadier-General Archer, it will be unnecessary for me to describe. I will only remark that my regiment, though exposed to a heavy fire, pressed forward so rapidly as to compel the enemy to abandon the battery, which fell into our hands. The regiment manifested no disposition to give up the attempt upon the breastwork, and fell back under orders from the right. In this part of the action all my field and staff were killed or wounded.

In the advance upon the third position of the enemy, my regiment, when within 100 yards of their line, had to pass through a thicket, which concealed the enemy from our view and rendered it impossible for us to move in much order. A rapid discharge of their small arms disclosed to us their position. When we had arrived within 40 paces of their breastwork, I allowed my regiment to return the fire for about three minutes, which they did with great spirit, and then ordered a charge. The men dashed forward with a cheer, and the enemy fled in confusion. The other regiments of the brigade seem to have charged at the same time with equal success. We had been in the enemy's position but a few minutes when a battery on our left opened a severe fire of canister, which enfiladed the part of the work we occupied. An order having been passed from the right to move by the right flank, I did so, following the regiment on my right over a ridge, under cover of which I collected as many of my men as remained, and moved to the open ground, where the brigade was reformed.

I am gratified to be able to report that my commissioned officers, without exception, displayed zeal and courage; none more than the gallant Major John T. Smith, whose death is deeply lamented by the regiment.

The casualties were as follows:

Officers killed............................................ 2

Men killed................................................. 11

Officers wounded........................................... 18

Men wounded................................................ 89

Missing.................................................... 18

Total*..................................................... 138

A majority of the missing are supposed to have been wounded and gone to the rear.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. D. FRY,

Colonel Thirteenth Alabama Volunteers.

Captain R. H. ARCHER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

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* But see inclosure to Archer's report, p. 926.

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