War of the Rebellion: Serial 039 Page 0861 Chapter XXXVII. THE CHANCELLORSVILLE CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

I also beg to command to your favorable notice my two couriers-Private [John C. J.] Ridgeway, of the Eleventh Alabama, and Private [J. W.] Brundidge, of the Ninth Alabama. The former had his horse killed at Salem Church.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. M. WILCOX,

Brigadier-General, Commanding, &c.

Major THOMAS S. MILLS,

Assistant Adjutant-General of Division.

HEADQUARTERS WILCOX'S BRIGADE, May 14, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to report that during the recent operations in this vicinity my command have lost no colors or standards, but that one Federal flag (Stars and Stripes) was taken on taken on the 3rd instant by the Eleventh Alabama-a small, coarse, and murch-worn flag. It was given to General McLaws.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. M. WILCOX.

Brigadier-General, Commanding, &c.

Major G. MOXLEY SORREL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

WILCOX'S BRIGADE, June 5, 1863.

SIR: In my report of the engagement with the enemy's at Salem Church on the 3rd ultimo, I mention that 200 of the enemy's dead were left on the field of battle, more than 150 wounded, and largely over 200 prisoners not wounded. The dead on the field in front of my brigade and buried by them was 248; 189 wounded. The prisoners were 375, as near as can be ascertained.

On the 5th, at night, near Bank's Ford, I mention that 13 officers and 150 men were taken the number taken was 236. The two captains whose companies (as skirmishers) took them, have given me these numbers. I mention that one Federal flag was taken on the field,but failed to report that two others were found on the field, abandoned by the enemy.

As to the time that the enemy crossed at Banks' Ford, there can be no doubt that their entire army was over by 11 or 11.30 o'clock Monday night. This fact I learn from a lieutenant of the Ninth Alabama Regiment, who got far in advance of his company, while deployed as skirmishers, and in the darkness of the night and thick undergrowth of pine fell into the enemy's hands and was taken down to the pontoon bridge at the ford, and made his escape from the enemy when thrown into confusion by our shelling of them. I make this report about the time of the crossing at Banks' Ford for the reason that I have heard it stated that the enemy were crossing all night and until broad day next morning. One of the Federal surgeons told me himself that they were crossing until sun-up, but I knew myself that he was mistaken. There was not one of the enemy on this side at Banks' Ford by 12 o'clock at night. As to the counting, as to numbers of dead, wounded, prisoners, &c., I make it merely to be correct, and for no other motive. Semmes and Mahone must have done, of course, good service also.

Respectfully, &c.,

C. M. WILCOX,

Brigadier-General, Commanding, &c.

Major W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General.