War of the Rebellion: Serial 039 Page 0837 Chapter XXXVII. THE CHANCELLORSVILLE CAMPAIGN.

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gallantry on these and other fields. My orderly, Private [A. A.] Morris, Company E, Tenth Georgia, also deserves special notice for the valuable service which he rendered me by the alacrity, coolness, and courage which he displayed in bearing orders to different parts of the field.

In closing this report, it is meet to acknowledge the goodness and mercy of God in conducting me safely through these and similar perils.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

PAUL J. SEMMES,

Brigadier-General.

Major JAMES M. GOGGIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SEMMES' BRIGADE, May 22, 1863.

MAJOR: In compliance with the order of the major-general of this date, calling for a report of standards lost or captured by our command in the recent engagements, I have the honor to state that no colors were lost by my brigade, but that the Fifty-third Georgia Volunteers, Colonel [James P.] Simms, captured the national colors of the Second Rhode Island Volunteers. I had not, until this moment, received the order from the major-general, and now hasten to comply with it.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

PAUL J. SEEMES,

Brigadier-General.

Major JAMES M. GOGGIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

No. 318. Report of Lieutenant Colonel Holt, Tenth Georgia Infantry.

MAY 8, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by this regiment in the recent engagement with the enemy:

The regiment was on picket duty in the city of Fredericksburg on the morning of April 29, when the alarm was given that the enemy had crossed the river. I at once formed my regiment, and personally reported to General Barksdale, he being in command of the city. Not being called upon during the day, we remained in the city until 12 p.m., when, being relieved, we joined our brigade.

On the morning of April 30, we were placed in the rifle-pits upon the heights near Fredericksburg, where we remained until 6 p.m., and were then marched up the Turnpike road beyond the brick church, and lay in line of battle until 9 o'clock the next morning. At this time marching orders were again received, and we moved up the Turnpike road 2 or 3 miles, and once more formed line of battle. The enemy, being but a short distance from us, fired upon us, wounding 2 men. I threw forward a company as skirmishers, and advanced them until the enemy left the field in our front, leaving their dead and wounded in our hands, together wit thirteen Springfield rifles and two cartridge-boxes, which were secured. The enemy being driven in, we again advanced about a mile; were halted at night, and remained during the night.