War of the Rebellion: Serial 039 Page 0758 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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was on our right, to our old line. In the evening and night we formed an abatis and breastwork of logs and earth, with a trench in the rear, making a very good defensive work. The trees were slashed 200 or 300 feet in front.

On the 2nd instant, we marched out on the Plank road, but soon returned and took our old position. Toward night stragglers came in from the Eleventh Corps, with three regimental flags, and were arrested by the command.

On the 3rd instant, the left of Williams' division, on our right, retired early in the day. Our line was moved down the right, and the Twenty-ninth Ohio was sent as a reserve.

At 7 a. m. on Sunday, the enemy commenced throwing shells upon us from our right and rear, causing some loss to our troops. The enemy's skirmishers were on our rear, annoying the men in the ranks. The Sixtieth Regiment New York Volunteers were placed in reserve, covering our left.

At 8 a. m. I received orders to move off as quickly as possible. Orders were given accordingly, and the movement commenced in good order. As we passed the Plank road, the Twenty-ninth Ohio was ordered to support a section of Best's battery, which was on our line on the Plank road. The One hundred and second regiment did not move promptly after having received orders. The night having been attacked soon after the movement commenced, the Sixtieth and One hundred and second New York Volunteers gallantly resisted the attack, driving the enemy back, and covering the retreat of the Seventy-eighth and One hundred and forty-ninth New York Volunteers, who were on the extreme right. Lieutenant-Colonel Redington, on the Sixtieth New York Volunteers, says he did not get the order to move, although I was assured that it had been given.

The Seventy-eighth and One hundred and forty-ninth New York Volunteers fell back in some confusion, Lieutenant-Colonel Cook being severely wounded in the commencement of the movement. The One hundred and second and Sixtieth New York Volunteers drove back the enemy, the One hundred and second New York Volunteers taking a flag, and falling back as ordered, followed by the Sixtieth New York Volunteers. Several prisoners were taken by the regiments on the right.

Colonel Lane, of the One hundred and second New York Volunteers, and Lieutenant-Colonel Redington, of the Sixtieth New York Volunteers, conducted their regiments with great gallantry, and effectually covered the movement out of our lines. Their regiments are deserving of special commendation. The One hundred and thirty-seventh New York Volunteers, commanded by Colonel Ireland, displayed great coolness and good discipline in all its movements.

Lieutenant-Colonel Redington overestimates the time that he staid in his position after the troops began to fall back from the left. He could not have been more than ten or fifteen minutes behind the movement of the left and followed closely after the One hundred and second New York Volunteers, as it was his duty to do.

Orders were sent simultaneously to the several regiments, and the One hundred and second New York Volunteers were attacked immediately after receiving the order. The Sixtieth and One hundred and second New York Volunteers were ordered to support a battery near the Chancellor house, and soon after joined their brigade.

Our loss was severe during this hour of inactivity on our part and during the subsequent attack on our right, the men showing great