War of the Rebellion: Serial 039 Page 0482 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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Next day, the 29th, we moved about 2 miles farther, and encamped until noon of the 30th, when we marched for the United States Ford, which we crossed on May 1, when we marched for the United States Ford, which we crossed on May 1, and encamped near the earthworks near the Rappahannock River, where part of the regiment did picket duty until next evening, the 2nd instant, when we marched out to the battle-field, a distance of about 4 miles, and formed line of battle on the left of the Eighth New Jersey Volunteers and about 100 yards in the rear of the outer line of breastworks, and stacked arms and lay there until daylight next morning, the 3rd instant, when we advanced about 20 yards, and lay down under the brow of a hill to support the First Division, Third Corps, that lay immediately behind the breastworks. The enemy soon after daylight next morning, the 3rd instant, when we advanced about 20 yards, and lay down under the brow of a hill to support the First Division, third corps, that lay immediately behind the breastworks. The enemy soon after daylight advanced and drove the First Division, Third Corps, away form the breastworks, when my regiment advanced with the brigade and drove the enemy.

My regiment alone captured about 200 prisoners and sent them to the rear, and aided in capturing five stand of colors (I claim two of these colors for my regiment). My regiment crossed the breastworks and still drove the enemy, when they were strongly re-enforced, when we were compelled to retire with the brigade. We rallied again and drove the enemy, when we finally had to retire on account of the severe loss of officers and men.

My regiment lost, in killed, the colonel, 2 officers, and 7 men; in wounded, 8 officers and 64 men; in missing, 29 men; in all, 11 officers and 100 men. We fell back to the woods in rear of the First Division, Third Corps, and stacked arms.

We stopped there until next day, the 4th instant, when we were shelled by the enemy pretty briskly for about an hour after daylight. The enemy made another attack with infantry and artillery about 4 o'clock in the afternoon, their shells bursting over our heads in the woods, wounding one of my men slightly.

Next morning, the 5th instant, my regiment put up a breastwork in front of it. Nothing occurred this day until 11 p. m., when we got orders to move, and started at 2 o'clock next morning, the 6th instant, when we marched back to the Rappahannock, and recrossed the pontoon bridges at the United States Ford at 6 o'clock, and arrived at camp about 4 p. m. the same day.

I am, sir, vary respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN P. DUNNE,

Major, Commanding 115th Pennsylvania Volunteers.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Third Brigade, Second Division, Third Army Corps.

No. 156. Report of Captain Thomas W. Osborn, First New York Light Artillery, Chief of Artillery.

OFFICE OF CHIEF OF ARTILLERY,

May 8, 1863.

MAJOR: I have the honor to report the movements of the light batteries of the division - Company K, Fourth U. S. Artillery, light 12-pounder guns, commanded by First Lieutenant F. W. Seeley; Company H, First U. S. Artillery, light 12-pounder guns, commanded by First Lieutenant