War of the Rebellion: Serial 039 Page 0297 Chapter XXXVII. THE CHANCELLORSVILLE CAMPAIGN.

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On May 6, my command marched from near Chancellorsville to White Oak Church, 22 miles, over very difficult roads and through a terrible storm.

I have only to report 1 man seriously and 2 slightly wounded. My scouts killed 3 and wounded 7 of the enemy.

The brigade sharpshooters captured........................ 24

One hundred and forty-third Regiment Pennsylvania

Volunteers captured....................................... 2

One hundred and forty-ninth Regiment Pennsylvania

Volunteers captured....................................... 86

One hundred and fiftieth Regiment Pennsylvania

Volunteers captured....................................... 20

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Total number of prisoners captured........................ 132

My command has more men for duty and more arms than when the campaign commenced, and is in excellent spirits and condition.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROY STONE,

Colonel 149th Pa. Vols., Commanding 2nd Brigadier, 3rd Div., 1st A. C.

Major General A. DOUBLEDAY,

Commanding Third Division, First Army Corps.

Numbers 56. Report of Colonel Edmund L. Dana, One hundred and forty-third Pennsylvania Infantry.

NEAR POLLOCK'S MILL, VA., May 9, 1863.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that the One hundred and forty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, with the Second Brigade, Third Division, First Army Corps, of which it forms a part, marched from its camp, near Belle Plain, on Tuesday, April 28 last, at 11.30 a. m., in a severe storm of rain, and encamped that evening near Pollock's Mill, below Fredericksburg.

On the following morning this regiment, with the remainder of your brigade, was moved near the banks of the Rappahannock as a reserve and support, with other troops of the force which had already crossed the river, remaining in this position until afternoon.

At about 6 o'clock on Thursday, April 30, a fire was opened by the enemy from the opposite hills, directed in part on your brigade, and continued until dark.

On the following day, May 1, this regiment, with the other two composing your brigade, was formed and held in line under arms, preparatory to crossing the river and charging upon a force of the enemy entrenched along the Bowling Green road. For reasons unknown to me the charge was not made, and no other event of importance in this connection occurred on that day.

On the following morning, we started with the residue of your command, and marched up the Rappahannock, crossing in the evening at the United States Ford, and moved on thence with the First Army Corps to take the position assigned us in one of the lines of battle near Chancellorsville, on the road leading from that place to Ely's Ford, arriving upon the ground before the close of the severe firing on Saturday evening, May 2. The regiment was formed for action agreeably to your orders, and so remained until, at a late hour, the firing ceased, and the men lay down to rest on their arms, after a day and night of unexampled marching and fatigue.