War of the Rebellion: Serial 039 Page 0227 Chapter XXXVII. THE CHANCELLORSVILLE CAMPAIGN.

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On the 4th, the enemy re-took the heights in rear of Fredericksburg, and re-occupied part of the town. I deemed it prudent to withdraw the instrument and train to the opposite bank of the river, in order to save the material in case the enemy advanced rapidly into the town. The instrument was taken back to the place in a short time afterward, but as all communication with General Sedgwick or his corps was cut off, it rendered no service worth speaking of. About 5 p. m., the station was re-established near the Lacy house, by order of the adjutant of the corps, where it remained until the 5th instant, when it was withdrawn by order of Captain Cushing, and the wire taken up to the Phillips house.

I remained at the station at the Phillips house until the 6th, when I was ordered to report to this camp.

The almost constant working of the line was owing greatly to the substantial manner it was put up by Sergeant Bunlick. The operators, Privates Hough, [Aaron] Levy, and Fribling, also worked faithfully.

With great respect, your most obedient servant,

F. WILSON,

First Lieutenant and Acting Signal Officer.

Lieutenant WM. S. STRYKER, Adjutant, Signal Corps.

Numbers 11. Report of Captain Benjamin F. Fisher, Third Pennsylvania Reserves, Acting Signal Officer.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA., May 9, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor, in accordance with the circular issued from your office, bearing date May 7, 1863, to submit the following report of signal duty performed during the late movement by the officers connected with that part of the army that concentrated in the vicinity of Chancellorsville:

The officers with the Eleventh, Twelfth, and Fifth Army Corps accompanied their respective corps in the detour across Kelly's and Ely's Fords, but had very little opportunity to render any service save at the crossing of the Rapidan River, where they opened communication between the different banks, under the direction of Captain Castle. I reported upon April 28 to General Couch, the senior general; he was then in the vicinity of Banks' Ford. Selected stations in the event of crossing at that point.

April 29. - We moved to United States Ford; established two stations, to watch for the advance of the column coming down the river.

April 30. - The enemy abandoned their works opposite the United States Ford. About 10 a. m., the advance was seen upon the opposite side, and we formed a junction with them at Chancellorsville.

May 1. - Reported to General Hooker, who arrived and assumed command in person; established a station 1 1/2 miles east of Chancellorsville, upon a tree; used it as a station of observation, but the advance falling back, I was compelled to abandon it. Captain Castle connected the extreme right of our army with General Howard's headquarters.

Saturday, May 2. - My party was augmented by the arrival of Captain [Frank N.] Wicker, Lieutenants [William J.] Galbraith, [S. Carey] Tuckerman, and Holland, from Washington. Expecting the army to advance toward Fredericksburg, I issued orders for the establishment of stations at Banks' Ford, the Decker house, Dr. Heston's, the scaffold erected the day before, and at Mr. Smith's, near Tabernacle Church;