War of the Rebellion: Serial 039 Page 0105 Chapter XXXVII. IMBODEN'S EXPEDITION INTO W. VA., ETC.

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of persons or property by the men under my command. They were nearly all Northwestern Virginians, and had much to provoke them to vengeance upon a dastard foe, who had outraged their unprotected families, but, with the willing obedience of the true Confederate soldier, every man obeyed all orders to respect private rights, even of their traitor neighbors.

Respectfully submitted.

J. D. IMBODEN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General R. H. CHILTON,

Asst. Adjt. and Insp. General, Army Northern Virginia.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, June 15, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded to the Adjutant and Inspector General.

Although the expedition under General Imboden failed to accomplish all the results intended, it nevertheless rendered valuable service in the collection of stores and in making the enemy uneasy for his communications with the west. The men and officers deserve much credit for the fortitude and endurance exhibited under the hardships and difficulties of the march, which interfered so seriously with the success of the enterprise.

R. E. LEE,

General.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

EVANSVILLE, W. VA., April 27, 1863.

GENERAL: I arrived here this morning with my cavalry. I sent Colonel [A. W.] Harman, with Major [Ridgely] Brown and Captain [John H.] McNeil, to Oakland from Greenland night before last, moving myself with the residue of my command on Rowlesburg, or Cheat Bridge. My horses and men were much jaded by bad weather and my forced march from Moorefield to Cheat Bridge. What success attended Colonel Harman I have not yet learned. I did not succeed in destroying the bridge or trestling at Cheat River. I have come here to feed men and horses and wait for news and junction with Harman, when I will make my way to you. My movements, as a matter of course, will be controlled by circumstances. A rumor reaches us of your having driven the enemy out of Beverly. General Mulligan started from Webster, on the Grafton and Parkersburg Railroad, to succor the force driven from Beverly. I am impatient for news from you, as also from Harman.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. E. JONES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

General J. D. IMBODEN,

Commanding at Beverly.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA, Dublin, Va., May 14, 1863.

GENERAL: I have just now received Major [J. R.] Claiborne's letter of the 13th (yesterday), from Lewisburg, informing me that he left you and