War of the Rebellion: Serial 039 Page 0083 Chapter XXXVII. OPERATIONS AT RAPPAHANNOCK BRIDGE, ETC.

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APRIL 11-18, 1863.- Scout from Beverly to Franklin, W. Va.

Report of Colonel George R. Latham, Second West Virginia Infantry.

BEVERLY, [W. VA.,] April 18, 1863.

CAPTAIN: The expedition which went toward Franklin has returned. They took Franklin by surprise, and penetrated 5 miles beyond, but found no enemy; 5 prisoners were brought in whom 1 forward this morning. We had 2 men wounded, 1 of whom was a member of the Swamper's Home Guards from Seneca. Will forward written report as soon as prepared.

G. R. LATHAM.

JOSEPH McC. BELL,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

APRIL 14-15, 1863. - Operations at Rappahannock Bridge, and at Kelly's, Welford's, and Beverly Fords, Va.

REPORTS.

Numbers 1. - First Lieutenant Samuel S. Elder, First U. S. Artillery, commanding Battery E, Fourth U. S. Artillery, of operations at Kelly's Ford.

Numbers 2. - First Lieutenant Robert Clarke, Second U. S. Artillery, of operations at Rappahannock Bridge.

Numbers 3. - Brigadier General W. H. F. Lee, C. S. Army, commanding Cavalry Bridge, Stuart's Division, Army of Northern Virginia.

Numbers 4. - Captain J. W. Strange, Second North Carolina Cavalry.

Numbers 5. - Colonel R. L. T. Beale, Ninth Virginia Cavalry.

Numbers 6. - Colonel John R. Chambliss, jr., Thirteenth Virginia Cavalry.

Numbers 7. - Captain Marcellus N. Moorman, Stuart Horse Artillery.

Numbers 8. - Lieutenant C. E. Ford, Stuart Horse Artillery.

Numbers 1. Report of First Lieutenant Samuel S. Elder, First U. S. Artillery, commanding Battery E, Fourth U. S. Artillery, of operations at Kelly's Ford.

RESERVE BRIGADE, REGULAR CAVALRY,

Camp near Bealeton, Va., April 19, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to report that after having, in compliance with your instructions at Hartwood Church on the 13th instant, reported to General Buford, commanding Reserve Brigade, regular cavalry, I proceeded with the battery to Morrisville the same day, and encamped with his command.

On the morning of the 14th, I proceeded with the brigade to Kelly's Ford, taking with me only the pieces. Some time after our arrival at the ford, the enemy opened sharply on the cavalry from two field pieces (rifled), on an elevation on the opposite of the river, at a distance of about 2,000 yards. I immediately placed my guns in battery at a point indicated by the general commanding, and in less than ten minutes silenced the enemy's fire and drove him from the field. The projectile used was chiefly Schenkl percussion shell, and worked excellently.