War of the Rebellion: Serial 039 Page 0058 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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estimate a much larger number. I have also to report the following captured property:

Pistols..................................................... 7

Sabers...................................................... 9

Bridles..................................................... 4

Carbines.................................................... 1

Saddles..................................................... 2

Horses...................................................... 2

There were many sabers lying on the field, but being of so many patterns, and without scabbards, I did not deem them worth picking up. Horses captured will be carried on the company report; the other property is in the hands of the men who captured it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. IRVIN GREGG,

Colonel, Commanding Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Colonel J. B. McINTOSH,

Second Brigade, Second Cavalry Division.

Numbers 5. Report of Major General James E. B. Stuart, C. S. Army, commanding Cavalry Division, Army of Northern Virginia, with orders.

HDQRS. CAV. DIV., ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

March 25, 1863.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith the very graphic report of Brigadier General Fitz. Lee, of the battle of Kellysville (March 17), between his brigade and a division of the enemy's cavalry. There is little to be said in addition. The dispositions made for meeting this anticipated raid were sufficient to have prevented, or very much retarded, the crossing of the Rappahannock at Kellysville. The report shows wherein these dispositions failed of their object. The brigade however, under its noble chief, so redeemed the day by an exhibition of the most extraordinary heroism that we are half disposed to lose sight of the picket failure in the outset.

Being charged by the commanding general specially with "preparations to meet Stoneman," I was present on this occasion, because of the responsibility which would necessarily attach to me for what was done; but having approved of Brigadier General Fitzhugh Lee's plans, I determined not to interfere with his command of the brigade as long as it was commanded so entirely to my satisfaction, and I took special pride in witnessing its gallant conduct under its accomplished leader.

The defeat was decided, and the enemy, broken and demoralized, retired under cover of darkness to his place of refuge (the main army), having abandoned in defeat an expedition undertaken with boasting and vainglorious demonstration.

I have the honor to inclose a copy of congratulatory orders from division and brigade headquarters and an order announcing to the division the death of the lamented and noble Pelham. I was especially indebted to him for his usual gallant services, and to Captain Harry [W.] Gilmor, Twelfth Virginia Cavalry, who accompanied me as volunteer staff [officer]; Major Lewis F. Terrell (the court-martial to which he belonged having taken a recess) buckled on his sword with commendable zeal, and came to the field, where he acquitted himself with credit, both as an artillery and as a staff officer.