War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 1037 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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it will require 800 hands one month to put these roads in repair, so as to run our rolling-stock to the Alabama River.

Respectfully submitted.

E. D. FROST,

Superintendent Mississippi Central

T. S. WILLIAMS,

Superintendent New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern Railroad.

HEADQUARTERS, Demopolis, July 30, 1863

General S. COOPER, Adjt. and Insp. General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor herewith to forward lists showing the names of officers and the number of non-commissioned officers and privates captured and paroled, whom it is deemed most desirable to exchange as soon as possible. *

The troops from WEST of the Mississippi River have very generally dispersed, so that it is impossible to collect them speedily. Officers have been sent to the Trans-Mississippi Department, with authority and under instructions to collect such troops and forward them to this side of the river.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

MORTON, July 30, 1863.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS:

It is reported on authority deemed reliable that no transports with troops have passed below the mouth of Red River, except those conveying re-enforcements to Banks immediately after fall of Vicksburg; that an engagement took place recently near Donaldsonville between Taylor and Banks, in which we were victorious, Taylor taking 6,000 prisoners; that Taylor has since fallen back toward the Teche, and that Magruder is moving to form a junction with him. It is confirmed that most of Grant's army has left Vicksburg. They Yankees report they are destined to Mobile and Tennessee.

W. J. HARDEE.

MORTON, VIA MONTGOMERY, July 30, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON, Secretary of War:

Lieutenant-General Hardee has just shown me your dispatch of yesterday. Since his dispatch to you of this morning, he has received from an officer of scouts a report contradicting the information communicated in it. We have, therefore, nothing clear as to the enemy's intention. between his wants and those of Mississippi. If he is threatened, I would send this infantry and artillery, except two brigades for Mobile, to join him for a battle. Infantry and artillery a little below 20,000.

J. E. Johnston.

HEADQUARTERS, near Morton, MISS., July 30, 1863.

Brigadier General W. H. JACKSON, Commanding, &c.,:

GENERAL: It is important to know the state of things on the Mississippi River, and to be kept informed. You are requested to send scouts to the river to observe and report what is going on both above and

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*Not found.

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