War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0954 Mississippi, WEST TENNESSEE, ETC. Chapter XXXVI.

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JACKSON, June 7, 1863.

General Johnston Canton:

Dr. Elliot, now in Natchez, states that Kirby Smith has gone to Milliken's Bend, to cut off Grant's supplies. Another party states that he saw four boats, loaded with our troops, going up Tensas River. General Breckinridge thinks this information can be depended upon.

BENJ. S. EWELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

PANOLA, MISS., June 7, 1863.

General JOSEPH E. Johnston, Canton:

Three boat-loads of troops passed Memphis Wednesday night, going down. Two boat-loads of horses landed at Memphis Thursday. Large quantity of corn and at Charleston depot, in Memphis. Reported that all the force on railroad is to be mounted, and 20,000 horses are to be sent to Corinth, to mount men from Middle Tennessee. Facts stated deemed reliable. You can judge of the reports.

JAMES R. CHALMERS.

PANOLA, MISS., June 7, 1863.

General JOSEPH E. Johnston, Canton:

Have just received, from two sources in front, information that the enemy is concentrating 20,000 men at Corinth, corroborating the rumor I had this morning from Memphis.

I am not prepared to answer for the reliability of this information, though it comes from my scouts.

JAMES R. CHALMERS.

HDQRS. FIFTH MIL. DIST., DEPT. MISS. AND E. La., Panola, June 7, 1863.

Colonel R. McCULLOCH, Comdg. SECOND Brigade:

COLONEL: I am directed by the brigadier-general commanding to say to you that he is informed that the enemy are concentrating a large force, said to be 20,000 at Corinth, and that it is intended to mount them on horses which are to be brought through from Memphis. Two boat-loads of horses and a large quantity of forage have already been landed at Memphis, and the forage is stored at the depot ready for shipment. Under these circumstances, the general thinks it very important that communication between these places should be cut off, and desires, if you find it practicable, that you should destroy the railroad, and prevent the transportation of these articled, &c. In this you will be guided entirely by your own discretion, and not attempt it unless you think it prudent to do so. If you require a large force to effect this, or if you are satisfied that a large force can operate successfully and advantageously against any point on the road, you will notify the general at once.

I am, colonel, &c., your obedient servant,

W. A. GOODMAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.