War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0818 Mississippi, WEST TENNESSEE, ETC. Chapter XXXVI.

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Vicksburg, May 2, 1863.

Brigadier-General FEATHERSTON, Grenada:

Have telegraphed you to proceed immediately to Vicksburg. Have you received my telegram? Answer.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

GRENADA, May 2, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON:

Your dispatch received. I am now in the act of leaving.

W. S. FEATHERSTON.

PORT HUDSON, May 2, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON:

Enemy's raid has successfully passed to Baton Rouge. I need mere cavalry and a good commander. Can I break up the post at Ponchatoula?

FRANK. GARDNER.

Vicksburg, May 2, 1863-1. 15 a. m.

Major-General [W. W.] LORING, Edwards Depot:

You make take battery from Edwards Depot, but four pieces of Point Coupee Artillery must be left at bridge to supply its place.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

Vicksburg, May 2, 1863.

Major General W. W. LORING:

GENERAL: The difficulty of subsisting a large army between the Big Black and Bayou Pierre Rivers is very great, and to subsist one of the size of your army cannot be done for any great length of time. If, therefore, when you reach the Bayou Pierre you believe the enemy can be driven back, and thus give to you the possession of the country, you can remain until you are satisfied as to your ability to do so, or, if you can hold your position you should remain. If, however, you find that the position on Bayou Pierre cannot be held, and you must fall back, you will fall back across the Big Black River. This movement will, of course, involve the abandonment of Grand Gulf, and when you do so the heavy guns and ammunition and all the stores that cannot be removed must be thoroughly and totally destroyed. Nothing has been heard from General Bowen since 5. 30 last evening. My anxiety to hear is very great, and I hope you will keep me constantly and regularly informed of your position and current events. If possible, stop the telegraph wire behind you, which can be done if the telegraph operator took with him his instruments. The supply train that went from here must be returned, in order that other wagons may be sent you. See that this is done immediately. I hope you will consult freely and fully with General Bowen on this subject, in whom I have the utmost confidence.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

Vicksburg, May 2, 1863.

Major-General LORING:

You had better move in the direction of railroad bridge across the Big Black River. Generals Stevenson and Lee, Taylor and Barton, are