War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0792 Mississippi, WEST TENNESSEE, ETC. Chapter XXXVI.

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JACKSON, April 27, 1863.

General JOSEPH E. Johnston, Tullahoma:

Following just received from Captain Henderson, commanding scouts:

Scout Voorhies reports, near LA Grande, 24th instant, but few troops there. Colonel Loomis' command have stopped repairing railroad from Grand Junction to Corinth; guarding their line very closely. Jackson, Tenn., evacuated. Scout Thompson reports, 23rd, near Corinth, re-enforced with cavalry since last report.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

JACKSON, April 27, 1863.

Colonel [GEORGE W.] ABERT, Canton, MISS.:

You will return with your regiment and a section of artillery as soon as transportation is provided to this place. Report on arrival.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

JACKSON, April 27, 1863.

Brigadier General John S. BOWEN, Grand Gulf:

The raid of the enemy is reported 3 miles WEST of Westville last night. It is possible they may be making for Hazlehurst and Grand Gulf, to fall on your rear.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT, &c., Jackson, April 27, 1863.

General John S. BOWEN:

Collect Wirt Adams' cavalry and send them out to meet the enemy, who were at 12 o'clock to-day at Hazlehurst. Follow them up without delay. Annoy and ambush them if possible. Move rapidly.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

JACKSON, April 27, 1863.

Brigadier General John S. BOWEN, Grand Gulf:

Which way the enemy will move from Hazlehurst is only a matter of conjecture. Port Gibson or Big Black Bridge most probable.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

GRAND GULF, April 27, 1863.

Major R. W. MEMMINGER, Assistant Adjutant-GENERAL:

SIR: I have the honor to report that all the movements of the enemy during the last twenty-four hours seem to indicate an intention on their part to march their army still lower down in Louisiana, perhaps to Saint Joseph, and then to run their steamers by me and cross to Rodney. In view of this, and from the fact that Port Gibson is almost essential to this position, I have examined myself and now have the engineers on a reconnaissance selecting a line of battle south of Port Gibson. Were it possible for me, with my extended line and small force, to spare them, I would recommend the sending of a regiment and section of artillery to Rodney, which would materially delay their crossing and advance. I now feel quite sanguine of success in the event they make a direct attack upon my front, right, or immediate left. But if they get so far