War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0753 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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plan of campaign. Under the circumstances, I think that not only should no more troops be sent from here, but that those who have just gone should be at once returned. A large force of Grant's army has established itself at New Carthage, below Warrenton, on WEST bank; another is at Richmond, La. Five boats (I suppose gunboats, though not yet positively informed), as I telegraphed you this morning, passed the Vicksburg batteries last night. I am momentarily expecting a report as to their character and condition. These five, together with the three gunboats and small steamer under Farragut, give nine vessels available for crossing troops or operating from above against Port Hudson. I am also somewhat apprehensive that the Charleston expedition failing there, may join Banks' against Port Hudson. The raft at Snyder's Mill, a great and important assistant in the flank defense of Vicksburg, has entirely given way, in consequence of the increased current and enormous pressure of drift. This compels additional guns at Snyder's, and they must come from Vicksburg. I received yesterday a Brooke gun (but without a single projectile) and a 10-inch columbiad; they will replace those removed to Snyder's.

My special purpose in this communication is to endeavor to recover the troops I put en route for the Army of Middle Tennessee, believing when I started them that I might temporarily re-enforce it without immediate and pressing danger to my position here. I have no precise information as to defenses of Corinth. I learn, however, that they have been greatly strengthened since our army abandoned them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON.

TULLAHOMA, April 17, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON:

It is reported by our troops at Tuscumbia [that] enemy at Corinth is supplied by railroad from Jackson, Tenn. You have two battalions of mounted troops in WEST Tennessee. Might they not interrupt the railroad?

J. E. Johnston.

TULLAHOMA, April 17, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON:

Can you communicate with Lieutenant-General Smith? He might cut off enemy's supplies going to New Carthage. If Grant is [not] re-enforcing Rosecrans again, and threatening you, recall Buford's brigade.

J. E. Johnston.

JACKSON, April 17, 1863-2. 30 a. m.

General John S. BOWEN, Grand Gulf, via Port Gibson:

Have telegraphed General Stevenson that Green's brigade can be sent to you as soon as possible.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

GRAND GULF, April 17, 1863-3 a. m.

[Colonel COCKRELL:]

COLONEL: If you can arrange with Major [I. F.] Harrison to hold the position at the flat-boat bridge, and allow you to bring your command

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