War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0730 Mississippi, WEST TENNESSEE, ETC. Chapter XXXVI.

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The same scout reported twelve pieces new steel artillery passed up the Memphis and Charleston road on 1st April. On 6th, he reports as follows:

No change on Memphis and Charleston Railroad. No troops of consequence passing up road. More empty boats gone down river from Memphis; supposed to Vicksburg. I am confident that no important re-enforcements, if any, have been sent to Rosecrans from Grand. No troops whatever are reported to have gone above mouth of Yazoo pass.

I endeavor to keep General Johnston informed of any movement which may effect his army. Enemy is constantly in motion in all directions. Appears now to be particularly engaged with Deer Creek, by land, from Greenville. Have force there to meet him. Also reported, but not yet confirmed, movement under McClernand, in large force, by land WEST of Mississippi must greatly depend on Movements of enemy's gunboats. I have several regiments now near New Carthage. Will inform you promptly of anything important, and if I ascertain that part of Grant's army is re-enforcing Rosecrans, will dispatch troops to General Johnston rapidly as possible.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

JACKSON, April 9, 1863.

General JOSEPH E. Johnston, Tullahoma:

There is no communication, by Memphis and Charleston Railroad, between Grand Junction and Corinth. At Corinth there are four brigades, estimated at 5,000 strong. No transports, loaded with troops, have been reported as having passed above mouth of Yazoo Pass.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

JACKSON, April 9, 1863.

Major-General STEVENSON:

Rut's troops will reach here to-day, and if you think great confidence in the practical sense of Mr. McFarland, I have sent him to select a proper point of defense for Sunflower, which must be made effective as soon as possible by the impressment of hands or otherwise.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

JACKSON, April 9, 1863.

Captain I. N. BROWN, Yazoo City:

Move down river, say to mouth of Sunflower, with your cotton-clad boats, to operate as circumstances may require.

J. C. PEMBERTON.