War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0725 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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FORT PEMBERTON, April 8, 1863.

Lieutenant General J. C. PEMBERTON, Jackson:

Captain [D.] Wintter left several days since for Vicksburg, via Jackson. I have to-day ordered one regiment of Hebert's brigade, and will hold General Moore's brigade and battery in readiness to leave. General Maury will go down the river to-day. We should not move too soon. No definite information of their yet sending large numbers of empty boats down the Mississippi, it is thought to re-enforce Rosecrans.

W. W. LORING.

Vicksburg, April 8, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON:

Bowen has three regiments and a section of artillery on the Louisiana side. The gunboats have moved up from Port Hudson. If they come up the river, will he recross or hold that position?

C. L. STEVENSON.

JACKSON, April 8, 1863.

Major-General STEVENSON:

I have directed General Loring to have the brigade ordered down to halt at Yazoo City, keeping transportation until further orders. Telegraphic communication will probably be opened there to-morrow.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

STEAMER ARCADIA, IN SUNFLOWER BAYOU, 12 MILES ABOVE THE MOUTH OF HUSHPUCKANAW, April 8, 1863.

Major J. J. REEVE,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Vicksburg:

SIR:

The order from DIVISION headquarters, dated the 4th instant, was received late in the afternoon of that day, at Snyder's Bluff. My command then consisted of four companies from Brigadier-General [E. D.] Tracy's brigade, numbering 215 total, 225 aggregate, and a section of Sengstak's battery, a 24-pounder howitzer, and a 3-inch Parrott gun, with two officers and 35 men, including drivers, but no horses. Captain John G. Kelly, assistant inspector-general, detailed by Brigadier-General [L.] Hebert to act as engineer officer, and Captain Johnson, assistant quartermaster Thirtieth Alabama, had also reported to me. The command was immediately put on board the Arcadia, and shortly thereafter Captain Quaite arrived, when, about 5 p. m., the command started up the river.

We arrived at Nine-mile Bayou, on the Sunflower, in the night, and remained there until the morning of the 5th. It was difficult to procure wood, none being cut on the banks. About the middle of the day we reached Rolling Fork, to which point the boat had been ordered for the purpose of landing wagons, a few soldiers, and some stores for Colonel Ferguson's command. This occasioned delay, and, at 3 o'clock on the evening of the 5th, we again started up Sunflower.