War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0698 Mississippi, WEST TENNESSEE, ETC. Chapter XXXVI.

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on a heavy timber frame. The platform or floor, with the tower, will revolve upon a large center pintle, combined with a relieving circular railway, about midway between the pintle and outer circle; the whole to be turned by four cranks, with a wheel and pinion placed in the four angles between the muzzles of the guns and near the outer circle; the tower to be perforated with small circular ports, just sufficient to allow the guns to protrude. All horizontal movements of the guns will be given by revolution of the tower, and the gunners will each have a brake to check the motion when he has his aim. Each gun, upon firing, will, by the revolution, be turned from the enemy and another brought to bear on them, and while three are firing successively, the first discharged will be reloaded and ready for action. It is almost unnecessary to add that the guns are upon two diameters, crossing at right angles. The only possible doubt I can imagine as to the feasibility of the plan would be in regard to revolving the tower; this, I am satisfied, from my experience in constructing locomotive turn-tables, I can insure as practicable. I would, of course, build an embankment as high as the port-holes, around the tower, to add to the security of its base, where the mechanism for its movement is located. The light will be admitted through the grating at the top. Respectfully,

JNO. S. BOWEN.

GRAND GULF, March 31, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON:

The Hartford and Albatross passed down at 8. 15 this evening. Owing to neglect of signalmen over the river, I had no time to heat shot. We fired in all about 60 shots. Struck them repeatedly; damage unknown. One of our 20-pounder Parrotts burst, killing and wounding 8 men.

JNO. S. BOWEN.

Vicksburg, March 31, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON:

The Vicksburg burned. Hartford and Albatross gone down the river.

C. L. STEVENSON.

Vicksburg, March 31, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON.

The disabled [boat] went down the river with the Hartford and Albatross. The wires are down south of Edwards.

C. L. STEVENSON.

JACKSON, March 31, 1863.

Major-General GARDNER, Port Hudson:

The wreck of the iron-clad Lancaster is floating down the river. Keep a sharp lookout for it, and, if possible, tow it ashore and save guns and engine.

J. C. PEMBERTON.