War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0683 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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intended to surround them last night and attack them this morning. It is supposed the firing this morning was his attack.

C. L. STEVENSON.

GRENADA, March 21, 1863.

General CHALMERS:

I am directed by Loring to telegraph you and Colonel [R.] McCulloch that the Yankees are in full retreat from Greenwood, and for you to intercept and annoy them all you can. Send word to Colonel McCulloch. I have no messenger to send.

J. Z. GEORGE.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH MILITARY DISTRICT, Panola, MISS., March 21, 1863.

Major G. L. BLYTHE,

Coldwater Depot, MISS.:

SIR: Your communication to General Tilghman, asking for permission to send a flag of truce to the Federal commander at Memphis, was referred by him to these headquarters, and has been approved and forwarded to General Pemberton for action. Captain Binford, commanding [W. W.] Faulkner's squadron, has been ordered to encamp at Cockrum's Cross-Roads and co-operate with you. The general directs that if the report is confirmed that the enemy are advancing to Hernando in force, you will order Captain Binford to fall back to Coldwater Depot, and that you, as senior officer, will assume command. If Captain Stillwell is not with you, order him to join you immediately. The general is very much in need of men for his artillery, and directs that you send 5 men from each of your companies. Those anxious to join artillery service will be allowed to volunteer to the number of 5 to each company. If the number do not volunteer, a detail will be made from those between the ages of eighteen and forty, and ordered to report here.

I have the honor to be, major, your obedient servant,

W. H. CARROLL, Jr.,

Assistant Inspector-General.

ALEXANDRIA, March 21, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel W. S. LOVELL,

Asst. Adjt. And Insp. General:

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of March 16. The major-general commanding objects to furnishing corn from the river parishes alluded to by you, for the reason that all the forage in that district of country is or will be needed by our own cavalry operating in those parishes. It is at the present time impossible to obtain forage for these troops elsewhere than immediately on the river. Large quantities of corn have been and are continuing to be forwarded to Port Hudson. Our own depots have been drained to throw supplies into Mississippi as long as the river remains clear or whenever an opportunity offers.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. SURGET,

Assistant Adjutant-General.