War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0657 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

sustain them. We will, under the circumstances, should the enemy come here, make a vigorous defense. The only drawback will be the want of ammunition, as previously stated. I have not received or heard from that you informed me your ordered General Stevenson to send at once; it ought to be hurried forward as rapidly as possible. A large number of boats are now below; besides, one of the largest boats on the river- the Prince of Wales-was send down yesterday with bacon and corn, so that it can come up any time.

W. W. LORING,

Major-General, Commanding.

LLOYD TILGHMAN.

JACKSON, March 9, 1863.

General S. COOPER,

Adjt. and Inspector General, Richmond:

The enemy's operations in the canal indicate great probability of his getting through. If he succeeds, will have to fortify Grand Gulf. Have no guns in department to do this, except two 8-inch and one 32, rifled, belonging to the Navy Department, en route to Shreveport, La. My transportation is utterly inadequate to my own necessities. Cannot allow anything to be transported over railroads in department unless for use of same. I have taken guns. I will place them in position.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Richmond, March 9, 1863.

General PEMBERTON, Jackson, MISS.:

The Navy Department has received a dispatch that the enemy had passed their boats into the headwaters of the Yazoo. What are the facts, and where are the boats?

J. A. SEDDON.

JACKSON, March 9, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

Reliable information received to-day represents six gunboats and about eighteen or twenty-small transports passed into Tallahatchee River on Sunday, the 7th instant. We have cotton-clad boats, and are fortified 6 miles above the mouth of Tallahatchee, General Loring in command. General [F.] Gardner reports to-day large re-enforcements at Baton Rouge; arrived yesterday and day before. Enemy not less than 30,000. We are strongly intrenched. Enemy is working night and day at canal opposite Vicksburg; I fear with prospect of success. I am arranging for batteries at Grand Gulf. Must take navy guns now here.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

JACKSON, March 9, 1863.

Major-General LORING,

Camp Pemberton, care of General Tilghman, via Grenada:

The following telegram received from General Stevenson this day:

The boats called for from the Yazoo have not arrived. Should it be necessary to move troops rapidly in that direction, it cannot be done.

C. L. STEVENSON.

Vicksburg and Snyder's Mill are more important than any other points. Boats must not be detained which are intended to supply them, neither can troops or ammunition be furnished you without them.

42 R R-VOL. XXIV, PT. III