War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0651 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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raid of the Yankees, my wife was detained on the boat for two days, and, on her return, brought messages of the strongest import, such as-

If his resignation was not accepted within a week, the crisis would come, and he would turn his guns on them, and sink everything on the river.

He shelled the troops who were plundering within range of his guns from the quarters of several of the planters, and the Abolitionists all curse him very bitterly, and swear to be revenged. If I can succeed in communicating, from these and other indications my plan seems feasible. It is certainly worth an earnest trial, and, for this reason, I have been keeping near the river, with the artillery well back. From the recent rain-floods, I could with difficulty get the guns to the banks for some days.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. FERGUSON,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

OFFICE CHIEF OF SUBSISTENCE, SECOND DISTRICT, DEPT. OF Mississippi AND EASTERN LOUISIANA, Vicksburg, March 3, 1863.

Major General C. L. STEVENSON, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: I have read a communication from Major Theodore Johnston to General Pemberton, of 26th February, complaining of me and other commissary officers of this district. I reply that I do not consider commissary officers of this district. I reply that I do not consider myself at all responsible for the woeful mismanagement and present condition of the commissariat. General Pemberton's orders, which, I understood Major Johnston to say, were issued at his instance, are sufficient cause to have produced this result. I assumed charge as chief of subsistence for this district on 10th February. I have not received a single dollar from Major Johnston, though I have sent him my estimates by a special messenger, requesting him, if he could not send the whole amount, to furnish as much as possible. I have had nothing to do with the shipment of sugar from Vicksburg; my connection with this affair will be decided by a court of inquiry, called for that purpose. I know nothing of Colonel Broadwell's movements, but am informed all the sugar and molasses, and a large portion of other stores here, were furnished through him. It is through him that I have been furnished with every dollar of funds that I have received for this district. I am not informed that the river is open to navigation, and do not believe in the practicability of shipping direct from Red River to this post. Major Johnston requests that I be relieved from duty. If, general, I have not discharged the duties of my office with entire satisfaction, I will cheerfully resign my place to a more efficient officer.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. L. GILLESPIE,

Major and Commissary of Subsistence.

HDQRS. SUBSISTENCE DEPT., SECOND DISTRICT, DEPT. OF Mississippi AND EASTERN LOUISIANA, Vicksburg, MISS., March 3, 1863.

M L. STEVENSON,

Comdg. 2nd Mil. Dist., Vicksburg:

DEAR SIR: The communication from Major Theodore Johnston to Lieutenant-General Pemberton, of the 26th ultimo, has been handed to