War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0597 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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that since the attack was abandoned by the enemy he had strengthened his works of defense very much; that he could spare General Bragg 8,000 men, but would not make the proposition for fear of accidents.

STERLING PRICE.

[Indorsement.]

The above statements were made to General Price and myself in the office of Lieutenant-General Pemberton.

EARL VAN DORN.

MONTGOMERY, January 23, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON, Jackson, MISS.:

Please place at Meridian four regiments, either those put there from General Bragg's department, or four equal, as you may prefer, with a brigade near Jackson. *

J. E. Johnston.

Vicksburg, January 23, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON:

The enemy have landed quite a force on the peninsula, near the canal, apparently with the intention of crossing at Warrenton. That we may contest their landing, I request that you will send [T. H.] Taylor's brigade and my two batteries of artillery. No movements on The Yazoo. My artillery horses are in rear. Please order them forward. I suggest that our transports be ordered not to pass Blackwater at present.

C. L. STEVENSON.

JACKSON, January 23, 1863-8 p. m.

Major General C. L. STEVENSON, Commanding Vicksburg:

Will order Taylor's brigade and field batteries, but the railroad is in such bad condition the movement will be slow. Shall leave for Vicksburg at 7. 30 tomorrow. Shall direct no steamboats pass Blackwater until further orders. You had better have another brigade ready to resist approach by Warrenton, and not wait for Taylor's. I hardly think they will attempt it, though.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

JACKSON, January 23, 1863.

Major-General LORING, Grenada:

I am informed, by letter of the 27th, that the Yazoo River Pass is not yet obstructed. It must be done at once. Send a courier direct to Major [G. L.] Blythe, with this order.

[J. C. PEMBERTON.]

JACKSON, January 23, 1863.

Major G. L. BLYTHE:

You will immediately use whole force, if necessary, to obstruct the Yazoo Pass effectually. Impress as many negroes as you deem necessary, and do the work at once.

J. C. PEMBERTON.

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*Request withdrawn. See Johnston to Pemberton, January 25 and 26, pp. 602, 605.

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