War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0594 Chapter XXXVI. Mississippi, WEST TENNESSEE,

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Corpus Christi and Iberia. Prices of all articles not yet agreed upon. Boat having just arrived, could not report cargo until received and weighed. When in Jackson, you told me such things ought to be taken when possible.

T. B. REED,

Major and Commissary of Subsistence.

JACKSON, January 22, 1863.

General C. L. STEVENSON, Vicksburg:

Strengthen the works at Snyder's Bluff. Put some rifle guns in position there for the defense of that point.

J. R. WADDY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF Mississippi AND EASTERN LOUISIANA,

Jackson, January 22, 1863.

Brigadier General Thomas H. TAYLOR, Comdg. Brigadier of Stevenson's Div.:

GENERAL: I am directed by the lieutenant-general commanding to say to you that you will hold your brigade in readiness to move at a moment's warning.

I am, general, very respectfully, &c.,

J. R. WADDY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

OFFICE CHIEF OF SUBSISTENCE, SECOND DIST.,

DEPARTMENT OF Mississippi AND EASTERN LOUISIANA,

Vicksburg, January 22, 1863.

Major JNO. J. REEVE, Assistant Adjutant-GENERAL:

DEAR SIR: In accordance with the directions of the major-general commanding, I would respectfully state that, in addition to the stores on hand, as per statements inclosed to Major J. G. Devereux,* assistant adjutant-general, on yesterday, we have a sufficient quantity of sugar and molasses to supply all the troops at this post for five months, the time for which we are directed to provide. There is more than this quantity now here, which can be reserved if required. There are some 2,000 head of cattle at Edward Depot, which are driven to this post in such quantities as the troops require, and I am informed that 7,000 more are crossing the river at Rodney, of which a sufficient number will be driven to Edwards to supply all the men here. Several thousand of the beeves can be driven here at any time by giving one or two days' notice, when it may be considered necessary, but they are kept there because pasturage is much better than here. The cattle all belong to the Government, and a large number of them are very poor and almost entirely unfit for issue. The troops are complaining very much of the quality of the meat, but as we are not permitted to buy, but directed to consume the Government cattle first, the evil cannot be remedied. I have had opportunities to buy about 2,000 fine beeves during the past five or six weeks, besides several small lots previous to that time. There is a man now here who has 700 good cattle for sale;

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*See p. 591.

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