War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0537 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE, Numbers 196. Vicksburg, MISS., July 20, 1863.

Major General John A. Logan, commanding THIRD DIVISION, SEVENTEENTH Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, whose health was so much impaired at the beginning of the Vicksburg campaign that the general commanding directed a leave of absence to be forwarded to him, which he declined to avail himself of, because of the active operations of the army in which he has borne so conspicuous a part, being still in enfeebled health, is, for the benefit of the same, hereby ordered to proceed to the State of Illinois. As soon as he has sufficiently recovered, he will rejoin his command at this place.

By order of Major General U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Number 145. Jackson, MISS., July 20, 1863.

I. Leave of absence, for the benefit of his health, is hereby granted for seven days to Brigadier General W. S. Smith, commanding DIVISION, with leave to apply at department headquarters for an extension until his health is fully restored. The general commanding regrets beyond measure that sickness or any cause should deprive the army of the services of an officer of such marked intelligence and such warm zeal in the cause of his country.

II. Brigadier General Hugh Ewing is hereby assigned to the command of the DIVISION heretofore commanded by General W. S. Smith, and will enter on the discharge of the duties forthwith. He will turn over the command of his present brigade to the senior colonel of his present command.

By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:

R. M. SAWYER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

NATCHEZ, MISS., July 20, 1863-3 a. m.

Lieutenant Colonel W. T. CLARK, Assistant Adjutant-GENERAL:

COLONEL: I could get several thousand more beef-cattle, intended for Johnston, and a large quantity of cotton, if I had a battalion of cavalry. I hear of 1,000 bales of cotton, 14 miles out, and 4,000 more cattle, 27 miles toward Brookhaven, near Woodville.

[J. L.] Logan's cavalry, 1,500 to 2,000 men, are encamped about Woodville, and are scouting the country. If I could get saddles and bridles, I would mount infantry enough to do the work, but they are not in the country. The people of the country are secreting cotton, stock,&c., in the swamps and out-of-the-way places, and an expedition would have to remain out several days to accomplish anything. To make an expedition after cattle safe, I ought to have at least 500 good mounted men. I have but 200. There will probably be a strong guard over the cattle as soon as they expect us to drive them off.

I have reliable information that one of the rebel officers I sent up by Lieutenant [Daniel W. .] Whittle, who gave his name as Major M. W. Simms, of General P. O Hebert's staff, is, in fact, a colonel on General Kirby Smith's staff, and I believe he had something to do with the transportation of cattle and ammunition through this place.