War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0513 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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were crossing cattle for the rebel army at Natchez, and were said to have several thousand there now, I have sent steamboats and troops to collect them, and to destroy their boats and all means for making a move. General Banks has made requisition on me for steamboats, coal, and forage, which I have sent. Shall I send the NINTH Army Corps back to Burnside so soon as Joe Johnston is driven from Jackson?

U. S. GRANT.

WASHINGTON, July 15, 1863-10 a. m.

Major-General GRANT, Vicksburg, and

Major-General PRENTISS, Helena, Ark.:

It is reported that General Price is moving north. All available forces should immediately move on his rear, so as to cut off retreat. The forces in Missouri will prevent his penetrating far into that State, and, if he is cut off in the rear, his forces must disperse or surrender. Apply to the naval commander for co-operation with gunboats on White River. No time should be lost.

H. W. HALLECK.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, July 15, 1863-8. p. m

Major-General GRANT, Vicksburg, MISS.:

No expedition to Texas will be undertaken at present. First clean out Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. I have written fully to you and to General Banks by mail. *

H. W. HALLECK.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE TENN., Vicksburg, MISS., July 15, 1863.

Major-General HERRON, Commanding Yazoo Expedition:

GENERAL: The enemy's cavalry, 4,000 strong, have crossed Pearl River, 14 miles above Jackson, evidently with the intention of getting to the rear of Sherman, to operate on his wagon trains. Whilst it is necessary for you to keep a force at Yazoo City, move eastward with all the force not necessary to leave back, so as to attract the attention of this cavalry. It will only be necessary for you to go eastward about 20 or 25 miles, on to a point east of Black River, where, if you hear of this cavalry, you can threaten them. The entire object of this hear of this cavalry, you can threaten them. The entire object of this move is to protect Sherman's wagon train from the rebel cavalry. You will, therefore, be governed in your movements accordingly. You need not stay out to exceed four or five days.

Very respectfully,

U. S. GRANT.

Vicksburg, MISS., July 15, 1863.

General SHERMAN, Jackson, MISS.:

If the enemy's cavalry have crossed to this side of the river, can you throw a force to the east side and destroy their trains?

U. S. GRANT.

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*See Halleck to Grant, July 11, p. 497, and Banks, July 13, Series I, VOL. XXVI,

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33 R R-VOL. XXIV, PT. III