War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0464 Mississippi, WEST TENNESSEE, ETC. Chapter XXXVI.

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Grenada with a smaller force. I have sent a messenger to Grant with a synopsis of my proposed plan, and will get an answer early in the morning. The quicker we move the better, although Johnston has doubtless done his best, and must have concentrated by this time; but my opinion is, that if we can whip him, it will, in addition to Vicksburg, be a final blow in Mississippi.

This rain is favorable to us, provided always Vicksburg has surrendered. The news is so good I can hardly realize it, though I have wished for it now fully six months. Jeff. Davis made it a test question, and I know its influence on the great WEST will be more than the capture of Richmond.

Colonel Clark Wright, who commands the cavalry down by Osterhaus, reports to-night the capture of a prisoner, who reports the arrival to-day of Breckinridge at Bolton, with the understanding that Johnston was to be there to-night and to attack us in the morning at Bridgeport.

Colonel Clark Wright, who commands the cavalry down by Osterhaus, reports to-night the capture of a prisoner, who reports the arrival to-day of Breckinridge at Bolton, with the understanding that Johnston was to be there to-night and to attack us in the morning at Bridgeport. I have no faith in Wright, but we must be prepared for anything.

Yours, truly,

W. T. SHERMAN.

HEADQUARTERS Fifteenth ARMY CORPS,

Camp near Bear Creek, July 3, 1863.

General OSTERHAUS, Comdg. DIVISION at the Bridge:

DEAR GENERAL: I inclose you the note of General McArthur with his sketch. Please read it, and at your convenience return to me for file. You will observe that General McArthur gives the information of himself in opposition to that of Colonel Wright. I am getting things from Oak Ridge to Tiffin so that it will be a close fit for anything to pass, and as soon as it is completed to my satisfaction I will have a small redoubt put in about 1 1/2 miles from Tiffin, toward Bovina, which will make a strong line. The flanks at the bridge and Oak Ridge must be able to be left alone in case the main forces are shifted to one flank or other.

If Tuttle is with you, tell him I want him to watch that road and tell me exactly what he sees with his own eyes or hears with his own ears. I don't care about his sending me rumors from some other place; I get plenty of them. If the lies and watches the road about Auburn or Cayuga for two days and tells what he sees, I can judge if any army proposes to bridge the Black at Hankinson's, to operate from the south. A few days' work would make the peninsula south. A few days' work would make the peninsula south of Warrenton also unassailable. When secure from surprise, assault, or sudden danger, then we can begin to break in upon their arrangements at Brownsville, Bolton, &c. I am always glad to hear of your scouts feeling well out.

Yours,

W. T SHERMAN.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. SIXTH DIVISION, ARMY OF THE OBSERVATION,

July 2, 1863.

Major-General SHERMAN, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Your letter of this morning is just received. The work of clearing and fortifying is progressing rapidly. My observations yesterday are accelerating my movements. They were as follows: I went to the ferry at Hooker's, and found a few of the ubiquitous cavalry keeping watch, with no visible signs of the enemy on their front.