War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0347 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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see and Helena here, to get any more I must look outside of my own department. You being engaged in the same enterprise, I am compelled to ask you to give me such assistance as may be in your power.

When I commenced writing this, it was my intention to propose sending you, if you will furnish the transportation, 8,000 or 10,000 men to co-operate with you on Port Hudson, but, whilst writing, a courier came in from my cavalry, stating that a force of the enemy are now about 30 miles northeast of here. They may be collecting there for the purpose of making an attack. At present, therefore, I do not deem it prudent to send off any men I have, or even safe, without abandoning some of the advantages already gained. I would be pleased, general, to have you come, with such force as you are able to spare. You can be supplied with everything from Young's Point. The road is now good across the point opposite Vicksburg, and, with your transports, the ferriage can be made. I am in hopes this letter will find you in possession of Port Hudson, and, therefore, of a much larger force to bring to this place than you could otherwise detach.

Colonel Grierson would be of immense value to me now. If he has not already started, will you be kind enough to order him here immediately? He should come up the Louisiana shore, to avoid delay.

U. S. GRANT,

MAY 25, 1863-9. 30 p. m.

General SHERMAN:

I am fitting a gunboat, the only one I have, to go down and attack the water battery; she will be ready to-morrow.

DAVID D. PORTER.

FLAG-SHIP BLACK HAWK, near Vicksburg, May 25, 1863.

Honorable GIDEON WELLES, Secretary of the Navy:

SIR: There is a strong force of vessels at the mouth of Arkansas River, ready at all times to accompany any expedition, but I doubt if the water in the river, which is falling rapidly, is favorable to such an enterprise beyond the post.

DAVID D. PORTER.

HEADQUARTERS THIRTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Vicksburg, MISS., May 25, 1863.

Major General U. S. GRANT:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that Colonel Clark Wright has not reported to General Osterhaus, and refuses to do so, having no orders to do so, as he says, and under orders that conflict with it. He also asks for two 12-pounder howitzers.

I most respectfully ask that Colonel Wright may be ordered by you to report to General Osterhaus.

General Osterhaus reports that the wounded, surgeons, and nurses left at Raymond have been captured by the enemy and paroled. He thinks there is no great force at present in the rear, but the enemy is fortifying Jackson and collecting large numbers of negroes there. His scouts found a small mounted picket at the cross-roads WEST of Brownsville. It is rumored that Johnston is near with a force, and that the enemy intended visiting the hospital at Champion's Hill to-day, to cap-