War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0293 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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FIVE-MILE CREEK, May 11, 1863.

Major General U. S. GRANT, comdg. Dept. of the Tennessee:

GENERAL: Osterhaus has just returned from the reconnoitering force sent forward this morning. One regiment of that force is now at the forks of the Raymond and Edwards Station roads. Detachments of cavalry are sent forward from that point, under instructions to proceed upon both of these roads to Fourteen-Mile Creek, and return with such information as they may be able to obtain. Water was found in the vicinity of New Auburn, but only a scanty supply. Beyond the divergence of the Edwards Station road and New Auburn, General Sherman might find water on a branch of the Fourteen-Mile Creek.

Your obedient servant,

JOHN A. McClernand.

FOURTEEN-MILE CREEK, May 11, 1863.

Major General U. S. GRANT, comdg. Dept. Of the Tennessee:

GENERAL: After a sharp skirmish, in which a few of my men were wounded (number not yet ascertained), I seized the main crossing of Fourteen-Mile Creek. General Hovey's DIVISION accomplished this result before 11 a. m.,----instant, and immediately established [an outpost] a half mile beyond, on the hills commanding the approach from Edwards Station, thus holding the creek and the road beyond it. I had substantially anticipated your order in the respect of this date. I have also sent infantry and cavalry to reconnoiter, with the view to determine upon further operations. I trust in all this my conduct will meet with your approbation. General Osterhaus is coming up, and this explains the unauthorized story of threatened danger. General Smith has communicated with me, and will hold the bridge over Fourteen-Mile Creek, WEST of this, to-night, and, at the hazard of extending his line too much, will watch as well as he can Baldwin's Ferry. The enemy's pickets fled from the brigade upon the general's approach. General Carr is here. I have just captured a prisoner (a Missourian), who says that the enemy, will refuse battle until we reach the railroad bridge. This, however, he expresses as an opinion.

Your most obedient servant,

JOHN A. McClernand.

HEADQUARTERS THIRTEENTH ARMY CORPS, May 11, 1863.

Major General U. S. GRANT, comdg. Dept. of the Tennessee:

GENERAL: On the map inclosed* is traced a new road, now being opened from Baldwin's Ferry to intersect the Hall's Ferry and Cayuga road somewhere between the two last-named places. This road is referred to in the communication of the rebel scout, Russell, to General Loring. Negroes coming in this morning report that the enemy expect to throw a force upon our rear. This road may form part of the route by which, with the aid of their steamers, they may attempt to flank us and fall on our rear. Would it not be advisable for some corps in the rear to send forward strong detachments to hold Hall's and Baldwin's Ferries and frustrate this probable design?

JOHN A. McClernand.