War of the Rebellion: Serial 038 Page 0275 Chapter XXXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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is of no use to them in a military point of view. They must live as far as possible off the country through which they pass, and destroy corn, wheat crops, and everything that can be made of by the enemy in prolonging the war. Mules and horses can be taken to supply all our wants, and, where it does cause too much delay, agricultural implements may be destroyed. In other words, cripple the rebellion in every way, without insulting women and children or taking their clothing, jewelry,&c.

Very respectfully,

U. S. GRANT.

HANKINSON'S FERRY, MISS., May 5, 1863.

Colonel W. S. HILLYER, A. A. D. C., comdg. at Grand Gulf, MISS.:

We will risk no more rations to run the Vicksburg batteries. The river falling will enable us to contract our lines so as to give but 8 miles of land transportation to bring them from Young's to below Warrenton batteries. The road has been commenced on this route, and will probably be finished in a day or two. When this is done, all the troops this side of Richmond can join their DIVISIONS and corps in the field, and you will so direct them. All the forage, stores, and cotton brought by us should be brought to [Grand] Gulf, in anticipation of this move, as soon as possible. To prevent my misunderstanding, I will state that the troops to come here are two brigades of General McArthur's DIVISION, two brigades of General Blair's (the THIRD of his to follow as soon as

re-enforcements of McClernand's corps can remain at Grand Gulf to constitute the garrison there; also a squadron of the cavalry and one of Logan's batteries, now behind at Perkin's plantation. All other forces are to return to Young's Point.

U. S. GRANT.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE, Milliken's Bend, La., May 5, 1863.

Major General STEPHEN A. HURLBUT,

Commanding SIXTEENTH Army Corps, Memphis, Tenn.:

GENERAL: Recent attempts have demonstrated the impossibility of sending supplies by the Vicksburg batteries during these moonlight nights. The army is, therefore, dependent upon land transportation for supplies. The distance to be wagoned to a point from which stores can be sent to Grand Gulf by steam boats is 44 miles, and since General Grant has advanced into the interior from Grand Gulf it is feared that, with the present limited land transportation, it will be impossible to keep the army from suffering. The advancing force has only 2 wagons to a regiment, with which to carry five days' rations, ammunition, and other stores. All other teams have been thrown into the general supply train, which is still inadequate. Under these circumstances the chief commissary and quartermaster here request me to advise you of the facts, and ask you to please send forward all teams that can possibly be spared from your command. They will be returned to you as soon as the present emergency passes away. General Grant is in the advance, and cannot be consulted on the subject of this letter, but the great importance of keeping the army supplied induces me to present these facts for your consideration. If you can spare any teams, it is