War of the Rebellion: Serial 037 Page 0347 Chapter XXXVI. THE SIEGE OF Vicksburg, MISS.

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been especially mentioned. During the siege he was selected to carry important dispatches through the lines of the enemy, and he duty was successfully performed. I commended him to the notice of the lieutenant-general as a bold and intelligent officer, and one who deserves a higher position.

A commanding, please find a tabular statement of the casualties of my DIVISION in the different actions, 7c,. In which it participated up to June 16. *

The absence of subordinate officer renders it impossible for me to give my whole loss during the siege of Vicksburg.

I am, major, respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. L. STEVENSON,

Major-General.

Major R. W. MEMMINGER,

Assistant Adjutant General.

[Inclosure A.]

HDQRS. DEPT OF Mississippi AND EAST LOUISIANA,

Vicksburg, MISS,

July 1, 1863.

GENERAL: Unless the siege of Vicksburg is raised or supplies are thrown in, it will necessary very shortly to evacuate the place. I see no prospect of the former, and three are very great, if not insuperable obstacles in the way of the latter. You are, therefore, request to inform me with as little delay as possible, as to the condition of your troops, and their alibied to make the marches and undergo the fatigues necessary to accomplish a successful evacuation. You will, of course, use the utmost discretion while informing yourself through your subordinates upon all points tending to a clear elucidation of the subject of my inquiry.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Lieutenant-General, commanding.

Major General C. L. STEVENSON,

Commanding DIVISION.

[Inclosure B.]

HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, Stevenson'S DIVISION,

July 1, 1863.

GENERAL: In reply to your inquiry as to the "ability" of my men to march and undergo the fatigues and hardships incidental thereto," I have the honor to state that probably half of them are fit to take the field.

The command suffers greatly from intermittent fever, and is generally debilitated from the long exposure and inaction of the trenches. Of those now reported for duty, fully one-half are undergoing treatment. These I think are unfit for the field.

Very respectfully,

S. M. BARTON,

Brigadier-General.

Major-General STEVENSON.

Commanding DIVISION.

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*See pp. 99,328.

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