War of the Rebellion: Serial 037 Page 0319 Chapter XXXVI. THE SIEGE OF Vicksburg, MISS.

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B, first Missouri Light Artillery), commanded by Brigadier General W. W. Orme.

On the 13th of June, we arrived at Youngs Point. Here I received orders to cross the river below Vicksburg and take up position on the extreme left of the investing line.

Owing to a want of transportation, this was attended with a little delay, but on the morning of the 15th troops crossed, and, after reconnoitering the enemy's works and driving in their pickets, y lines were established within 1,200 yards of the enemy's main line of defense. The first parallel was opened the following night and preparations made for conducting the siege in proper form. Considerable difficulty was experienced in collecting engineer tools, and also in obtaining a supply that this arose from the caliber of the guns being unsuited to the ammunition in the ordnance depot, and not from any negligence on the part of the officers of the ordnance department.

The ground in my front, as you are aware, was unfavorable for siege operations, being a level plateau interspersed, with ravines, which afforded little shelter for troops, on a account of being commanded in many places by the guns of the enemy's works. The trenches, however were pushed forward as rapidly as possible, and by the 25th were within 600 yards of the enemy's line of forts. In front of my left center I had established a battery of 42-pounder rifle-pits guns, which were loaded from the Namy. This battery, under the command of Acting Master Reed, of the Benton did excellent service, and I cannon speak too highly of the bravery and energy of this young officers. Indeed, during co-operation from the Navy. During the siege several of the enemy's rifle-pits in my front were carried by assault, and quite a number of prisoners taken. These have been forwarded, as directed, to department headquarters.

On the evening of the 3rd, instant, I received notice that terms of capitulation were being considered, with orders from the major-general commanding to cease firing, but to be extremely guarded against a sortie, or attempt of the enemy to cut his way out. My troops were under arms during the night, but nothing unusual occurred, and at 9 o'clock of the morning of the 4th, my DIVISION being one of the three selected to occupy the city, and the signal agreed upon having been displayed along the enemy to cut his way out. My troops were under arms during the night, but nothing unusual occurred, and at 9 o'clock of the morning of the 4th, my DIVISION being one of the three selected to occupy the city, and the signal agreed upon having been displayed along the enemy's line. I marched in and took possession of the works in my immediate front. Several of these were well built, and from their stench could not have been carried by assault without heavy loss. Considering the unavoidable delays before mentioned, and he length of my line I have reason to be proud of the progress made by my troops during the short time they were engaged in the siege. their conduct has been admirable in all respects.

I am under special obligations to Brigadier-Generals Volunteers and Orme, commanding brigades to Captain Comstock and Hoeppner, engineers in charge of the works, and to the several officers of my staff. I inclose herewith a list of casualties which have occurred during the siege. *

I remain, colonel, your obedient servant,

F. J. JERRON,

Major-General, commanding.

Lieutenant Colonel John A. RAWLINS,

A. A. G. Depot of the Tennessee.

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*List not found.

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