War of the Rebellion: Serial 037 Page 0303 Chapter XXXVI. THE SIEGE OF Vicksburg, MISS.

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day, where it is believed they did much effective service. Nine days of this time the Eleventh Iowa Volunteers was stationed 4 miles in the rear of the brigade, doing picket duty on the Bridgeport and adjacent roads.

On June 20 (they day of the general cannonading), three regiments of the brigade (the Thirteenth, Fifteenth AND Sixteenth) were placed on the left of Brigadier-General Ranson's brigade, in order co-operate in any movement that might be required. No movement of the infantry taking place, however the command returned to camp in the evening.

On the 23rd, the brigade moved 12 miles to the rear, near Strauss's plantation, on the road to Jackson one regiment (the Thirteenth Iowa)being sent 4 miles to the front, to picket the roads leading to Messinger's and Birdsong Fords.

Remained there until the evening of July; 3 then moved to Messinger's Ford, one regiment (the SIXTEENTH Iowa Volunteers) being posted on the immediate bank of the river, and the other three on a hill about half a mile back, in support of the Tenth Ohio Battery, then attached to the command.

Early in the morning of July 4, a detachment, consisting of Company G. ELEVENTH Illinois Cavalry (General McArthur's body guard), and four companies of the SIXTEENTH Iowa Volunteers, crossed Big Black River for the purpose of clearing the road to Cowan's house, a point some 2 miles front the river. Half a mile from the crossing they encountered the enemy's skirmishers, whom they drove before them in a slight skirmish until they reached the point designates. The enemy now retired rapidly, and the detachment having orders to proceed no farther, placed pickets on the two roads leading from Cowan's house, a point countered the enemy's skirmishers, whom they drove before them in slight skirmish until they reached the point designated. The enemy now retired rapidly, and the detachment having orders to proceed no farther, placed pickets on the two roads leading from Cowan's and, with the main body near the house, held the position until about noon, when the enemy appeared in force with artillery, cavalry, and infantry, and opening fie on the detachment, compelled them o fall back to the river, and finally in the afternoon to recross it. The Tenth Ohio Battery opened on the enemy as soon as the detachment fell back, and it is through, did considerable execution. On the evening of the same day we received the news of the surrender of Viche same time Brigadier-General Lauman relieved the brigade with his own troops.

I cannot close this report without bearing testimony on the alacrity cheerfulness, and gallant bearing which has been shown by the officers and men of the command through all the various and trying scenes of the late campaign. In long marches, under the heat of a burning Southern sun, in skirmishers with the enemy at all points of the line of investment, and with Johnston's troops at the rear, in the rifle-pits in front of Vicksburg, either with rifle in hand as sharpshooters or with spade throwing up additional works, but one feeling appeared to animate them, and that was the desire to do their whole duty.

Very respectfully your obedient servant.

WM. HALL, colonel Eleventh Iowa Volunteers, commanding.

Lieutenant Colonel W. T. CLARK,

Assistant Adjutant-General