War of the Rebellion: Serial 037 Page 0235 Chapter XXXVI. THE SIEGE OF Vicksburg, MISS.

Search Civil War Official Records

Gulf, which was opened upon by the gunboats early on Wednesday morning, lasting six hours, when received orders to disembark and take up our line of march for a plantation 4 miles below. Encamped for the night.

The next day April, 28, about noon, we re-embarked on the gunboat General Price, and ran down the river to a plantation 10 miles below, on the Mississippi, shore, where we disembarked. About midnight we took up our line of march for Port Gibson, and arrived within 4 miles of Port Gibson on the morning of May, 1 when we found the advance of our army had engaged the enemy., we were immediately ordered into position, which was the reserve of the Thirteenth Army Corps. We had not been long in position until we took a prisoner, he being the first that had been taken. They day was excessively hot, but, notwithstanding, our men stood it bravely. In the afternoon we advanced farther than any other command, but were ordered back to our old position, having 2 men wounded. Night came on, and we were ordered to lie on our arms.

Next morning before daylight we were called up and ordered to fall in line of battle, which we did, and remained so until 7 o'clock of the morning of May 2, when the First Brigade was ordered in the advance, the SIXTEENTH Regiment on the right. We marched thorough the woods for about 2 miles, when we found the enemy had evacuated the town. Orders were given to march the command by the right flank, but owing to some misunderstanding were not carried out. However, out brigade to some misunderstand were not carried out. However, our brigade was first in the town, and planted the first American flag on the courthouse. We found the enemy had destroyed the bridge across the Bayon. A detail was made, and before four hours had elapsed our troops were crossing.

Next morning, May 3, about 7 o'clock we received orders to take up our line of march, which we did, and arrived at the bridge over bayou Pierre, which the enemy had tried to destroy, but failed. We went into camp about 7 o'clock the same evening, and remained until the morning of May 6, when we again took up our line of march, and arrived at Rocky Springs on the afternoon of the 6th, where we remained until the afternoon of the 9th. We again took up our line rived at Big Sandy, encamping for the night.

The morning of the 10th, we started for Cayuga, where we arrived at about 8 p. Mn., and remained until the morning of the 12th, when we took up our line of march for Edwards Depot, and arrived within 5 miles of it, when we drove in the enemy's pickets and encamped for the night.

Next morning 13th, instant, we were ordered back, and marched to Auburn, where we remained until the morning of the 15th, instant, when we again took up our line of march for Raymond, and arrived there about 9. p. m. Encamped for the night.

Next morning,16th instant, we took up our line of march, and came in contact with the enemy's pickets about 6 miles from Raymond. We immediately got into position and opened fire on them with the artillery, driving them before us. A general engagement ensued, which resulted in driving back the enemy.

On the morning of the 17th instant, we were order to advance. We had not gone far when we found the enemy had fallen back on Big Black. We passed through Edwards Depot, and marched on to Big Black, where we arrived at about 12 m/. Formed line of battle this side, and was ordered to advance; we did so. Had not proceeded far when 400 prisoners surrendered to this brigade. The enemy crossed