War of the Rebellion: Serial 037 Page 0138 Mississippi, WEST TENNESSEE, ETC. Chapter XXXVI.

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pieces in all), a large quantity of ammunition, thousands of small-arms, and 3,000 prisoners. By our brigade were captured 1,460 small-arms, several hundred accountermets, chiefly collected by the Eleventh Wisconsin Volunteers, 1, 120 prisoner, and 4 stand of color. It is, perhaps, worthy of remark that more men were captured by my brigade than I had men in the charge; but this brilliant success was not accomplished without considerable loss; 145 killed and 185 wounded in the space of three minutes, the time occupied in reaching the enemy's works, attest the severity of the fire to which my men were subjected. An official list is herewith submitted, and also a drawing of the ground over which the charge was made. *Officers and men, almost without exception, behaved with the greatest gallantry; their conduct reflects credit upon themselves and the noble cause in which they are engaged. Among the many who behaved efficiently and bravely I take pleasure in mentioning the following: Colonel C. L. Harris, eleventh Wisconsin Volunteers, led his regiment gallantry during the whole battle, and by his coolness and good judgment rendered valuable service. Co. Samuel Merrill, twenty-first Iowa Volunteers, deserve particular mention for his bravely and the gallant manner in which he led his regiment to the charge. Colonel William M. Stone Twenty-SECOND Iowa Volunteers, though suffering severely form disease, was present in the field, sharing its dangers, and has my thanks for the promptness with which he moved his command against the left of the enemy's works. Lieutenant CO. S. L. Glasgow, of the Twenty-THIRD Iowa Volunteers, and command of their respective regiments after the fall of their colonels, deserve the highest praise, and are entitled to great credit for the activity, courage, and skill which they displayed during the hottest part of the engagement. They had the honor of leading their regiments into the enemy's works. Major Arthur Platt, eleventh Wisconsin Volunteers, major Atheton, twenty-SECOND Iowa Volunteers, and Major Clard, of the Twenty-THIRD Iowa Volunteers, freely exposed themselves and did their duty nobly. The line officers of the different regiments, almost to a man, displayed great personal courage, and handled their companies with much ability; their good conduct greatly assisted the charge. Captain Houston, company A, captain Brown, company I, and Lieutenant Rawlings, company F, of the Twenty-THIRD, with their commands, broke the enemy's line in a swamp at the edge of the timber, and poured an enfilading fire into the ditches that routed the rebels in confusion. Lieutenant Rawlings, company F, twenty-THIRD Iowa, captured the colors of the Sixty-first Tennessee, wresting them from the rebel colorbearer. Captain Houston, of Company A. Twenty-THIRD Iowa, captured the colors of the Twenty-first Arkansas. Corp. John W. Boone, color-bearer of the Twenty-THIRD, fell, severely wounded; Corp. J. T. Shipman grasped them [the colors] and bore them gallantly to the front and through the whole charge. Captain Crooke, Harriston, Boardman, Swivel, Watson, Voorhees, and Jones, of the Twenty-first Uowa, gallantly led their companies against the enemy's intrenchments. Lieutenant Howard, twenty-first Iowa, acting adjutant, was among the first in the charge, and while manfully doing his duty and cheering on his men, fell, mortally wounded., Lieuts.

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*Not found.

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