War of the Rebellion: Serial 037 Page 0123 Chapter XXXVI. BATTLE OF CHAMPION'S HILL, MISS.

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to push up the straggler. When I returned, finding him near the center of the line, I learned that our extreme left had been driven back, and the we were about being heavily flanked there. The order to retreat was given. To convey this to him, I south General Loring, who I was formed, was making his movements to the left by a rear road, and found him with his troops in motion near the position I last saw occupied by General [S. D.]Lee, who commanded the left brigade of Stevenson's. S staff officer (I think Colonel [W. T.]Withers) rode up when I had delivered my order and said that a force was advancing on what had been our center, and would cut off some of Stevenson's troops unless combated. General Loring said he would move to that point. After Bowens' and Stevenson's forces had crossed the creek, general Loring covering their retreat, general Bowen took position to cover the ford, and General Lee, with the remnants of three brigades, started up to the bridge for its defense. After giving these instructions from General Pemberton, I left the field to rejoin him, which I did at the fortifications at Big Black Bridge.

Very respectfully,

J. C. TAYLOR,

Aide-de-Camp.

MONTGOMERY, ALA., July 31, 1863.

SIR: In pursuance of orders, I beg leave to make the following statement of orders carried, and what else I did by your command on May 16, at the flight designated as Baker's Creek, and also on MAY, 17, at the Big Black: The first order given to me was to see that the troops were all drawn up in line of battle; after which the wagons were ordered to return to Edwards Depot, so as to take the road to Clinton. General Stevenson was then ordered to move back toward same place, moving along with wagons. I was then sent with an order to Brigadier-General Buford (whose men were in line of battle in a peach orchard) to fall back to (whose me were in line of battle in a peach orchard) to fall bact o the hill in his rear about 8 o'clock, so as to make a continuous line with the balance of Major-General Loring's DIVISION. Then I was sent to halt General Stevenson, and the appearances were at that time that the attack would come from more toward the right. This was done, and General Stevenson formed his line of battle on the crest of a hill in a large field. I thin this line was formed about 9 o'clock. About 10 o'clock I was sent by yourself to place advance skirmishers in front of General Stevenson's DIVISION, which was done. By this time the skirmishing between our pickets and the enemy's was increasing, and from the direction appeared to be moving toward General Stevenson's left of Lee's brigade. Between 11. 30 and 12 o'clock the attack began in earnest, and was evidently to be on our left. The first order I carried, I believe-except of those given to General Stevenson's left of Lee's brigade. Between 11. 30 and 12 o'clock the attack began in earnest, and was evidently to be on our left. The first order I carried, I believe-except of those given to General Stevenson's almost in your presence, to move his brigade (Barton's and Cumming's)still to the left-after the attack was one to General Bowen to send one of his brigades at once to the support of General Stevenson. General Bowen returned with me to you, and told you that he vas threatened and was afraid to weaken himself. In a short time I again carried an order for one of his brigades and moved it up, reporting the fact to General Bowen. About this time (2,30 o'clock) our men commenced straggling back in large numbers, and you sent me with your couriers to rally them. This I did for some time, until it was useless to try any longer. I then returned to you, and was sent to hurry General Loring up and to see where