War of the Rebellion: Serial 036 Page 0619 Chapter XXXVI. BATTLE OF PORT GIBSON, MISS.

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gade at the battle of Port Gibson; has distinguished himself in all the battles and during the whole campaign by bravery, energy,

intelligence, and untiring industry. He is well worthy of promotion.

Lieutenant Colonel Harvey Graham, twenty-SECOND Iowa, distinguished himself in the last two battles, and was taken prisoner at Vicksburg.

Colonel Samuel Merrill, Twenty-first Iowa, received a contusion from a shelf at Port Gibson, and was shot through both legs while leading his regiment in the charge at Black River Bridge.

Lieutenant Colonel C. W. Dunalp, Twenty-first Iowa, was wounded in the foot at Port Gibson, and was killed in command of his regiment at Vicksburg.

Major S. G. Van Anda, twenty-first Iowa, distinguished himself in all the battles, and commanded his regiment at Vicksburg after Lieutenant-Colonel Dunlap was killed.

Colonel W. H. Kinsman, Twenty-THIRD Iowa, was killed at the head of his regiment while leading the charge at Black River Bridge.

Lieutenant Colonel S. L. Glasgow, Twenty-THIRD Iowa, commanded his regiment at Port Gibson, and distinguished himself both there and at Black River Bridge.

Captain H. H. Griffiths, First Iowa Battery, was with us at Port Gibson, where he behaved very handsomely.

Sergeant Leibert, First Iowa Battery, behaved very handsomely, and was wounded on the same occasion.

Sergt. Joseph E. Griffith, Twenty-SECOND Iowa Infantry, distinguished himself by going into the fort attacked by the SECOND Brigade, with 11 men, and came out with 12 prisoners, though all his companions had been killed.

My staff officers were Lieutenant Colonel C. A. Wood, eleventh Wisconsin, assistant inspector-general, provost-marshal, and chief of staff. He commanded his regiment at Port Gibson, and distinguished himself in all the battles.

Major T. J. Brady, Eighth Indiana, acting ordnance officer, has been very active and successful in keeping us supplied with ammunition. He distinguished himself in all the battles, commanding the skirmishers in advance at Port Gibson and Black River Bridge.

Captain C. H. Dyer, assistant adjutant-general, is a faithful, intelligent officer, and has been of great use to the command. He distinguished himself in all the battles, and is well worthy of promotion.

Captain L. H. Whittlesey, eleventh Wisconsin, acting assistant quartermaster, has been most untiring and successful in furnishing us with supplies; was acting assistant adjutant-general of the SECOND Brigade at the battle of Port Gibson; has distinguished in all the battles and during the whole campaign by bravery, energy, intelligence, and untiring industry. He is well worthy of promotion.

Lieutenant John E. Phelps, THIRD U. S. Cavalry, aide-de-camp, showed his usual bravery and intelligence in all the battles. He was the first man on horseback, and the first man at the guns in the fortifications at Black River Bridge. He is well worth of promotion.

Lieutenant A. Browman, NINTH Iowa Infantry, acting aide-de-camp, exposed himself freely, as usual, in the transmission of orders in all the battles. His bravery, energy, and intelligence entitle him to promotion.