War of the Rebellion: Serial 036 Page 0618 Mississippi, WEST TENNESSEE, ETC. Chapter XXXVI.

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ately used; arms, which were taken by the men in exchange for their own; cartridge-boxes and other equipments, provisions, and various articles of which there was no time to take an account. Account was taken of 1,751 prisoners, 6 colors, 20 pieces of artillery, 1,421 small-arms, and 5 car-loads of provisions and ammunition.

In conclusion, while all have done their duty, and many are entitled to special mention of whose names and deeds I am not yet informed, I would respectfully submit the following list of officers and soldiers, who, from personal observation and official reports, I know to be entitled to favorable notice:

Brigadier General William P. Benton, commanding First Brigade.

Captain George S. Marshall, assistant adjutant-general, first Brigade.

First Lieutenant J. P. Wiggins, aide-de-camp to General Benton.

Colonel David Shunk, eighth Indiana, distinguished in all three of the battles; hit in the leg at Vicksburg.

Lieutenant Colonel C. S. Parrish, Eighth Indiana, distinguished at Port Gibson, though so ILL he could hardly stand.

Major T. J. Brady, Eighth Indiana, acting ordnance officer, distinguished in all the battles, commanded skirmishers in advance at Port Gibson and Black River Bridge.

Colonel H. D. Washburn, Eighteenth Indiana, Distinguished in all the battles, and well worthy of promotion.

Major J. C. Jenks, eighteenth Indiana, inspector-general and chief of staff, First Brigade, distinguished in all the battles, mortally wounded at Vicksburg while in the discharge of his duties.

Colonel C. E. Lippincott, Thirty-THIRD Illinois, distinguished in all the battles, had his horse shot under him while in advance in pursuit to Edwards Station, and was wounded in the foot at Vicksburg.

Lieutenant Colonel E. R. Roe, Thirty-THIRD Illinois, wounded at Vicksburg.

Major L. H. Potter, Thirty-THIRD Illinois, distinguished in all the battles.

Colonel G. W. K. Bailey, ninety-NINTH Illinois, distinguished in all the battles and wounded in the leg at Vicksburg.

Lieutenant Colonel Lemuel Park, Ninety-NINTH Illinois, distinguished in the battles of Port Gibson and Black River Bridge.

Captain Klauss, First Indiana Battery, distinguished in all the battles; has exploded a great deal of ammunition for the enemy during the siege of Vicksburg.

Orderly Sergt. J. W. Gerhardt, First Indiana Battery, distinguished in all the battles, and well worthy of promotion.

Brigadier General M. K. Lawler, commanding SECOND Brigade, distinguished in the last two battles.

Colonel C. L. Harris, Eleventh Wisconsin, commanded the SECOND Brigade most of the time before the arrival of General Lawler, and is entitled to credit for its organization and discipline. Although too ILL to command his brigade at the battle of Port Gibson, he was on the field and exposed to danger. He distinguished himself at Black River Bridge and Vicksburg, and is well worth of promotion.

Lieutenant Colonel C. A. Wood, Eleventh Wisconsin, now acting inspector-general, provost-marshal, and chief of staff for the DIVISION, commanded the regiment at Port Gibson and distinguished himself in all the battles.

Major Arthur Platt, Eleventh Wisconsin, showed great bravery in all the battles.

Captain L. H. Whittlesey, Eleventh Wisconsin, now acting DIVISION quartermaster, was acting assistant adjutant-general of the SECOND Bri-