War of the Rebellion: Serial 036 Page 0503 Chapter XXXVI. EXPEDITION TO GREENVILLE, MISS., ETC.

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Vicksburg, April 8, 1863.

Lee will secure Rolling Fork, and move up Bogue Phaliah to get in rear of the enemy, who are forcing Ferguson down Deer Creek.

C. L. STEVENSON,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON.

Vicksburg, April 9, 1863.

The enemy, some eight regiments in sight, had driven Ferguson on night of 7th nearly to Rolling Fork; re-enforcements were arriving. I think this is a formidable expedition, probably to co-operate with one from Steele's Bayou. I think half of the brigade with Maury should go at once to Rolling Fork, the other to Snyder's, to operate up Lower Deer Creek. If the cotton-boats are not needed above, they had better be here.

C. L. STEVENSON,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON.

Vicksburg, April 9, 1863.

Report from Ferguson, dated 11 a. m. yesterday. He had made a stand 16 miles above Rolling Fork; expected to be re-enforced that night. Two regiments must have been near him; nothing of the artillery heard yesterday afternoon. Please order back the intrenching tools taken by General Featherston, and any others that can be spared. A sufficient number cannot be obtained here. Send back Captain [D.] Wintter.

C. L. STEVENSON,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON.

HDQRS. SECOND DISTRICT, DEPT. OF MISS. AND E. La.,

Vicksburg, April 14, 1863.

MAJOR: I send you herewith reports from General Lee and Colonel Ferguson. *

I shall direct General Lee to place works on Sunflower at such points as he may think proper, and will cause all exposed points to be secured by defensive works.

General Lee suggests that a cotton-clad be placed on Sunflower as a guard-boat until we can get out supplies. General Maury thinks the cotton-clads are too unsafe for troops. I will provide for that defense in some other way.

The raft has been strengthened by additional chains. I am preparing railroad iron, connected by links, for additional security.

It would be dangerous to attempt to put the Yazoo raft below Haynes'. The current is too strong. If it should become unmanageable and strike the drift, it would be very apt to carry away the main raft. At the bend at Haynes' it can be turned into an eddy, prepared and swung, if the other should give way, but even there it should not be placed in

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*See pp. 504,507.

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